Archlinux sound not working


  • How to Use PulseAudio on Arch Linux
  • How to Fix Buzzing Sound from Speakers on Arch Linux with Intel Chipset
  • Fix for no sound issue on Linux when using headphones
  • How To Fix No Sound in Ubuntu And Linux Mint
  • Fix no sound in Wine
  • How to Use PulseAudio on Arch Linux

    In he started working on PipeWire : a project that has come to full fruition in Fedora Workstation 34 , where it handles both audio and video. In addition to that, it also merges the world of pro-audio with mainstream Linux. In this interview we will talk about where PipeWire came from, where it is at and where Wim sees it going from here. Wim Taymans: PipeWire really evolved out of two earlier ideas. The first one was PulseVideo , which was written by William Manley back in It was a small server that would send the video from a v4l2 camera to one or more other processes.

    It used GStreamer, DBus and file descriptor fd passing to do this fairly efficiently. It resulted in a bunch of patches to GStreamer regarding fdmemory. Around that time we started to think about screen capture for Wayland. I was asked to investigate options. The idea was then to take the PulseVideo idea and implement the possibility for clients to provide streams as well not just v4l2 devices.

    CS: Ah right, because when PipeWire was originally introduced to Fedora in Fedora 27 it was only dealing with video right? WT: Yes, there were only wild ideas about trying to handle audio as well. The version that ended up in Fedora 27 needed another rewrite to make that happen, really. PipeWire will route this stream to the applications like Firefox or the screen recorder.

    We have some more advanced features implemented such as DMABUF passing and metadata for the cursor and clipping regions when sharing a single window. CS: So there was no real PipeWire precursor for video, as most stuff just interacted directly with v4l, so I assume it must have been a big task porting over things like GNOME Shell and the web browsers to start using it?

    WT: There was nothing for screen sharing, it was just X11 calls to grab the screen content. Jan Grulich worked with the upstream WebRTC project to add code to interact with the new portal APIS defined for Wayland, to negotiate screen sharing options and then native PipeWire support to fetch the screen content. For webcams there is not much progress yet. Browsers still access the v4l2 camera directly. There is a portal to negotiate webcam access through PipeWire but that has not been implemented in browsers as far as I know.

    How is PipeWire dealing with that challenge? Theoretically this should provide a way to run all existing applications without modifications.

    CS: How did your thinking about the problem space evolve as you worked on it? WT: As the project went forward, I started to investigate if this framework could also support audio. It would need a substantial rewrite to make this work efficiently. GStreamer and dbus needed to be replaced with something more low level to make audio viable, especially pro-audio.

    At the same time both GObject and DBus started feeling heavy for the low level system I was designing. I started experimenting with a new small media plugin API at around mid It was still all very GObject like but I started to reimplement the v4l2 and audiomixer plugins in this new framework. By the end of , I moved away from DBus as well to a more Wayland like protocol.

    Early was when I seriously started to think about implementing the features of an audio server as well. This is also when we came up with the name PipeWire. By the end of I had a working audio server with a JACK-like graph model, well… at least working in the context of my basic test case. After some discussions with members of the Linux Pro-Audio community they convinced me that I needed to make some more drastic design changes in the way scheduling and mixing worked if this was ever going to be able to replace JACK for them.

    This is when the final re-architecting started and eventually became, after 2 years of development, the first 0. CS: I know the Pro-audio support you mention has got a lot of buzz in the community, so who did you initially talk to and what has the reception been so far from the wider pro-audio community?

    WT: As mentioned, I had some discussions with them back in early Robin Gareus and Paul Davis were instrumental in driving the changes that lead to the current implementation. I think everybody would love to have a seamless, integrated and user friendly experience that can be used for both Pro and Consumer Audio use cases and there is definitely interest in how PipeWire will evolve to make this happen. For instance, just this week I landed Freewheeling support in PipeWire, which should be out in Fedora by the time you read this.

    Beyond that latency reporting is the big TODO item remaining. So there is some more work to do. CS: And what about the PulseAudio developers? How have they taken the arrival of PipeWire?

    Does Lennart Poettering hate you now? WT: I think they are fine with it. We organized a hackfest in October with some of the PulseAudio developers to talk about PipeWire so it was not a surprise. WT: I see PipeWire as a much lower-level framework to move data around between apps and devices. GStreamer still remains ideally suited for those higher level tasks, muxing, demuxing, encoding, decoding, etc. CS: So you see them compliment each other more than compete? WT: They absolutely complement each other.

    While the plumbing and post processing is better done in GStreamer. CS: Any community contributors you want to highlight so far beyond yourself? WT: Absolutely! Almost all of the new exciting Bluetooth work has been done by community contributors.

    Pauli Virtanen has been doing fixes all over the place such as many Bluetooth improvements and general fixing and stability improvements to the SCO plugins, implementing codec switching and delay reporting. He also has his hands in other areas such as the PipeWire IPC connections and the default-node and policy in the session manager, as well as some object management improvements.

    Huang-Huang Bao eh5 who maintained a pulseaudio-modules-bt has been contributing a lot of changes such as LDAC ABR support, Hardware volume support and numerous stability and compatibility fixes all over the place to bring the bluetooth support to the same level as the pulseaudio module. They have also been working on an improved session manager called WirePlumber, which we will try to include in Fedora Dmitry Sharshakov implemented the Bluetooth battery status reporting, which is a relatively new feature in bluez and now also supported by PipeWire.

    There also also a lot of people active on the issue tracker that try to help triage bugs, provide help and improve the wiki pages. WT: Most of the midi tools, really. I never really used midi before I started to add support in PipeWire. I got fascinated by the various synths, like Helm, zynaddsubfx, and more recently Vital and the free Vitalium application. There is a whole world of music creation tools that become available when you have midi and JACK compatibility that were previously little or unknown.

    I love the idea of Inge and I would love to see it developed some more. I imagine that a tool like this can be used to model and tweak the effect chains in PipeWire.

    CS: In terms of pro-audio and midi, are you a musician yourself and are these things you see yourself using personally going forward? I did some recording of guitar and voice in Ardour using PipeWire to test things out. For the PRO audio use cases we need to implement what in Jack is known as Freewheeling and then latency reporting.

    After that, we can start to look at all the exciting new things we can do now with PipeWire. On the video front, a lot can be improved. CS: Are there any specific areas you would love to see more contributors to in PipeWire? WT: Sure! I think there are so many exciting things you can make now.

    I would say a simple curses based patchbay would be a nice contribution. In PipeWire it is relatively easy to write new external sinks or sources. I would love to see a native implementation of a good general purpose network protocol like ROC or so. CS: You recently started a new job inside Red Hat, can you tell us a little about that and what that means for PipeWire? This is about enabling Audio and Video in cars and PipeWire will play a major part in realizing that.

    One of the challenges is to be able to route all the audio capture and playback streams in a car in a flexible way.

    Modern cars also have a large amount of video cameras that need to be managed. Part of the plan is to improve PipeWire for these use cases. The expectation is that some of these use cases will also benefit desktop users eventually. Like this:.

    How to Fix Buzzing Sound from Speakers on Arch Linux with Intel Chipset

    Meaning, it acts as a proxy for all the sounds your system produces. Before reaching the speaker, the sound from any software has to go through PulseAudio. Because of this mechanism, PulseAudio allows infinite ways of customizing the sound before you can hear them. However, if you need suitable front-end, there are additional packages to be installed. Installing PulseAudio Update the package database of pacman sudo pacman -Syu sudo pacman -S pulseaudio PulseAudio front-ends For taking the maximum advantage of PulseAudio daemon, there are a number of front-ends that allow advanced functionalities.

    Check out all the console front-ends for PulseAudio. For this tutorial, my personal preference is the PulseAudio Manager. You can either install it manually or use AUR helper like Yay. The interface is pretty simplistic with very few available options. This tool offers the easiest way to navigate through the audio system and check the status of a different device.

    Start KMix. From this dialog, you can directly control the volume of all the sounds. You can check out the playback and control its volume. It allows configuring the latency offset and sound volume. Note that the playback is always going to be counted as one of the sources for sound input for any listening app. Without a proper profile, the sound output will be majorly hindered.

    Some devices may not even get sound signals. This option essentially allows you to control the right-left audio output. The next icon is for setting a sound source as fallback. All these functionalities are available on other tabs as well. Pacmd This is the default console for communicating with the PulseAudio server. For all the available options and tutorials, check out the man page of pacmd. PulseAudio config files PulseAudio uses a few configuration files for all sorts of purposes.

    By manipulating the configuration files, you can alter the behavior of sound permanently on your system. There are 2 directories that PulseAudio use for configurations. Bonus: restarting PulseAudio This is a quite handy trick to remember. Sometimes, PulseAudio may behave in unexpected behavior. You can restart the daemon without rebooting the entire system.

    Run the following command for killing all the processes related to PulseAudio. I love Linux and playing with tech and gadgets. I use both Ubuntu and Linux Mint.

    Fix for no sound issue on Linux when using headphones

    Fluxbox runs fine though. Warty LiveCD was able to launch X on it, but had issues with display picture size the picture seemed to not fit into the screen ; the same with AltLinux Sisyphus which, unlike Warty, even managed to boot into X after installation.

    Has anyone had success with this hardware? Do I need to change something? I tried that on the 5. No option to change screen resolution, FFS! But but when ubuntu was eating about 90 megs to boot on my laptop megs availablethe kde-desktop seems to boot with about 75 megs, which would make Kunbuntu basically suitable for megs machines.

    Can anybody confirm no flamewar pls pm While my system now works, I have a similar issue about system freeze after minutes under X. Reported the error and they made me do many tests from memtest86, etc, etc. I always tell them that Ubuntu was the only system freezing.

    Neither XP nor Arch with I also have installed had problems at all. I will give Hoary a try.

    How To Fix No Sound in Ubuntu And Linux Mint

    Other than that Ubuntu works perfect for me. Both have the latest DE at the moment Gnome 2. Ubuntu is a bit bloated. Example: why my laptop need a RAID service trying to boot up always.

    For multimedia, sorry but Ubuntu sucks, even with all the plugins installed, movies play a bit slow. Arch do it perfectly. Arch do not follow releases, so there is no need for an apt-get dist-upgrade, after editing your apt.

    The normal upgrade system updates everything. Not sure if it is better. I use it on both a Pentium-M 1. It is no slower than Warty was for me.

    One was a fresh install, the other I just did an upgrade using apt-get. For example, Had to run some cryptic amixer command line to get it to work. Installer selects the largest resolution that the monitor supports as the default. They seem to be bugs that are getting ignored. That really blows. If the fonts are too small for your liking, I would suggest increasing the font size instead of decreasing monitor resolution.

    Also check that X detected the ppi of your monitor correctly — should be something ish on your monitor. Any suggestions? Works fine for me. Ubuntu 5.

    Fix no sound in Wine

    For webcams there is not much progress yet. Browsers still access the v4l2 camera directly. There is a portal to negotiate webcam access through PipeWire but that has not been implemented in browsers as far as I know.

    How is PipeWire dealing with that challenge? Theoretically this should provide a way to run all existing applications without modifications. CS: How did your thinking film ninja the problem space evolve as you worked on it?

    WT: As the project went forward, I started to investigate if this framework could also support audio. It would need a substantial rewrite to make this work efficiently. GStreamer and dbus needed to be replaced with something more low level to make audio viable, especially pro-audio. At the same time both GObject and DBus started feeling heavy for the low level system I was designing.

    I started experimenting with a new small media plugin API at around mid It was still all very GObject like but I started to reimplement the v4l2 and audiomixer plugins in this new framework. By the end ofI moved away from DBus as well to a more Wayland like protocol. Early was when I seriously started to think about implementing the features of an audio server as well. This is also when we came up with the name PipeWire. By the end of I had a working audio server with a JACK-like graph model, well… at least working in the context of my basic test case.

    After some discussions with members of the Linux Pro-Audio community they convinced me that I needed to make some more drastic design changes in the way scheduling and mixing worked if this was ever going to be able to replace JACK for them. This is when the final re-architecting started and eventually became, after 2 years of development, the first 0. CS: I know the Pro-audio support you mention has got a lot of buzz in the community, so who did you initially talk to and what has the reception been so far from the wider pro-audio community?

    WT: As mentioned, I had some discussions with them back in early Robin Gareus and Paul Davis were instrumental in driving the changes that lead to the current implementation. I think everybody would love to have a seamless, integrated and user friendly experience that can be used for both Pro and Consumer Audio use cases and there is definitely interest in how PipeWire will evolve to make this happen.

    For instance, just this week I landed Freewheeling support in PipeWire, which should be out in Fedora by the time you read this. Beyond that latency reporting is the big TODO item remaining. So there is some more work to do. CS: And what about the PulseAudio developers? How have they taken the arrival of PipeWire? Does Lennart Poettering hate you now? WT: I think they are fine with it. We organized a hackfest in October with some of the PulseAudio developers to talk about PipeWire so it was not a surprise.

    WT: I see PipeWire as a much lower-level framework to move data around between apps and devices. GStreamer still remains ideally suited for those higher level tasks, muxing, demuxing, encoding, decoding, etc. CS: So you see them compliment each other more than compete? WT: They absolutely complement each other. While the plumbing and post processing is better done in GStreamer.

    CS: Any community contributors you want to highlight so far beyond yourself? WT: Absolutely! Almost all of the new exciting Bluetooth work has been done by community contributors. Pauli Virtanen has been doing fixes all over the place such as many Bluetooth improvements and general fixing and stability improvements to the SCO plugins, implementing codec switching and delay reporting.

    He also has his hands in other areas such as the PipeWire IPC connections and the default-node and policy in the session manager, as well as some object management improvements. Huang-Huang Bao eh5 who maintained a pulseaudio-modules-bt has been contributing a lot of changes such as LDAC ABR support, Hardware volume support and numerous stability and compatibility fixes all over the place to bring the bluetooth support to the same level as the pulseaudio module.

    They have also been working on an improved session manager called WirePlumber, which we will try to include in Fedora Dmitry Sharshakov implemented the Bluetooth battery status reporting, which is a relatively new feature in bluez and now also supported by PipeWire.


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