Saints row 3 remastered ps4 controller inverted


  • Saints Row: The Third Remastered – Fix: Controller Not Working on PC
  • NACON Revolution Unlimited Pro Controller (PS4/PC) Review
  • PS I Love(d) You – Jak & Daxter – The Precursor Legacy
  • Why do so many shooters (especially open world) have awful controls?
  • GTA Remastered Controls Patch v2 released for PSVita/PSTV
  • Gem Smashers Trophy Guide
  • Saints Row: The Third Remastered – Fix: Controller Not Working on PC

    Disappointingly, I found myself met with some of the worst camera controls in a shooter that I have ever experienced. There is a tremendous input delay, seemingly caused by a mixture of a large deadzone, and a literal input delay where the game takes a moment to respond.

    On top of that, the menu only features a 'sensitivity' slider, so both aim down sights and regular aiming are at the same sensitivity, making it very difficult to get any sense of precision in the game. Irrespective of everything else in the game, for me this is enough to fundamentally ruin the experience, every fight feels like a struggle with the controls, and I find myself adapting my gameplay around that rather than playing the game in a way that feels natural.

    For instance, instead of trying to aim at enemies, I'll let them walk into my sightline then shoot, which leads to a more passive and unenjoyable style of play. Homefront: The Revolution is just one of many games that I've played recently which have fundamentally terrible controls, and control options. And I wanted to make a thread to dedicate towards some of those games for a moment, and hopefully maybe discuss what makes a game control well. Everything you place into your game, fantastic narrative, interesting set pieces, cool gameplay options, are subservient to how your game controls because those core controls are what gets the player from each of those moments to another.

    They Feel Fine to Me I wanted to dedicate a section of this post for the folks that will come here and discredit others experiences with the idea that there's nothing wrong with the controls, because they feel fine to them. Whenever I try and talk about the controls of a particular game, this group of people always exist, and some of them will even tell you that adapting to the awful controls is a matter of 'getting good' at the game, or that the 'stiff controls' are just 'weighty' because that's the 'design intent'.

    As someone that's worked in game development across a large number of titles. I have never spoken to a developer that has expressed that they are making their controls unresponsive because they want their game to have a certain awful feel to it.

    The vast, vast majority of these incidences are the result of the development staff either Not knowing what 'good controls' are their staff don't have the experience in this particular area Not taking enough time and consideration towards making a game control well But at the end of the day, it's important to remember that it's not just about you, and that it's about accessibility too.

    A game that is super snappy and responsive all the time might not be right for someone that does not have strong motor controls, equally a game that requires a lot of stick movement to get anything to happen, might not be ideal for someone that has difficulty with larger motor movements. Crucially, whether you like or dislike a games camera controls as they are, it's important to support the idea that the game should be accessible and feature a robust set of options so that the camera movement can be inclusive for everyone that wishes to play.

    This game has awful aim acceleration, and there's no means in which you can turn this off in the menus. On the PC version I hear you can make things a bit better by using the console commands, but anyone on console is out of luck. Ghost Recon Wildlands and Breakpoint I want to like Ghost Recon games because they provide big open world sandboxes, but there's just so much input lag that the game feels pretty unresponsive.

    This is a perfect example of a very-triple A game coming from a team with all the right tools to make it feel good to play, messing things up. I didn't have these issues with Advanced Warfighter or even Future Soldier, so if I were to hazard a guess I imagine the input latency comes as a result of the open world and tech changes between those games. Doom Eternal This one isn't so bad once you turn off 'aim smoothing' which basically adjusts your aim to make it look smoother, but less accurate to what you tried to do.

    Why is a feature that is literally designed to make the game less responsive, enabled by default? I imagine a lot of players played the game with aim smoothing enabled, wondering why the controls felt a bit stiff at times. The options to make adjustments to the controls are Rust Console Good god where do I begin. This is one of the worst controlling games I have ever played, and the settings are really the icing on the cake. Why does the default control mapping have vertical sensitivity greater than horizontal?

    Why, no matter what I do in the settings, can I not fix this? While there seems to be a robust set of settings options, it seems as though irrespective of how you adjust them, there's no means to get things just right. I don't know if the settings don't work or what but the controls alone made the game miserable for me. Perhaps they've addressed some of these issues in a patch, but I'm long gone. Homefront: The Revolution I mentioned this one at the top, but it comes down to poor settings and high aim acceleration and deadzone issues.

    Pay Day 2 Large deadzones, very responsive controls with aim acceleration that seemingly can't be reduced. If I recall correctly there's also no means of adjusting the ads and regular sensitivity independently. I used to have a friend that worked at Overkill and he claimed that the console controls were something of an afterthought, unsurprising given the end result. Far Cry 3 Remake Crazy deadzone makes the game almost unplayable.

    No patch for this yet? There are some deadzone issues in the original too, but that doesn't justify somehow making them worse in the remake. Ubisoft seem to be a common culpret when it comes to these issues. Paladins This game has a fair set of options but irrespective of what you do it's difficult or near impossible to get things just right because there are only three response curve options and each of them are quite 'odd'.

    Paladins also happily matches you with it's PC player base online, who obviously have far fewer concerns with the games controls. Here's a good reddit post that goes into the issues with more detail than I could, because I haven't played this game in some time. A lot of folks liked how it felt before. In general, this is bad practice unless you want to push a lot of players away from your game.

    If you're worried that players won't notice it, advertise it in-game when these players return. Uncharted 3 Uncharted 3 somewhat famously shipped it's multiplayer component with awful controls, and Naughtydog had to get members of the community in to come and explain the problem to them before offering a resolution. The baffling thing was that the controls in the multiplayer component of the game were just fine This one is especially odd to me because there's clearly a guy at Naughtydog or there was at the time that knew what the controls should feel like, because that person ensured the the multiplayer component of the game felt good.

    What's odd is that that person didn't play the singleplayer and inform the rest of the design team that the controls felt different. Different from the multiplayer, and different from Uncharted 2 and it's multiplayer.

    Uncharted 3 aiming controls to be patched www. Splatoon 1 and 2 Regardless of how you feel about Splatoons implementation of gyro controls I'm a fan of them personally , the gyro controls in part shine because the regular configuration is really quite poor. There's no option to adjust the games deadzone, and only a basic sensitivity slider is present in the game. So if you don't like how it feels out of the gate you're out of luck. Control Done Right There are a lot of games which I think have 'acceptable' controls.

    Games like Far Cry 5, Destiny 2, The Division and Destiny all have control schemes which I think for me personally, are good enough for the game to be enjoyable. However, these games still tend to lack options to make adjustments, so there are likely still players who feel that the game doesn't feel right for them. So when it comes to the games that get their controls right, I think it comes down to three crucial factors The game needs to feel responsive out of the gate.

    At first touch I believe the game should have a low deadzone, controllable aim acceleration or none , and a relatively low sensitivity so that all players feel as though they are in control right away.

    Robust and effective settings for players to make adjustments to the controls. Whatever default control configuration you decide upon, there will always be a large group of players that have preferences elsewhere, therefore it's important to offer as robust a set of options as possible so that players can get to something that they like, and ultimately, so that they can get to a point where they feel in control of the game. As well as robust, these settings need to be effective too, as I've seen many devs who include options which are either poorly described, or do not do what they claim.

    A space for people to configure the controls without pressure. If you don't want folks to quit your game immediately, don't throw them into a multiplayer match before they've had an opportunity to make adjustments to their controls. With these attributes in mind, I will highlight a few games that get this right Titanfall 2 and Apex Legends I've bundled these together because by and large, they feel the same and offer the same control options.

    Both of these games feature a good, and very controllable default configuration. Furthermore, they do a fantastic job in letting players customise the feel of the controls to their own liking, through multi-layered options on the games controls. At the top level we have a fairly basic sensitivity option for both regular aim, and aim down sights, as well as some basic response curve and deadzone adjustments which affect how responsive the controls feel.

    But the game also features an advanced set of options, so that players can tweak the controls to their liking. This means that anyone playing the game has the option to easily make quick adjustments without delving into a complex set of settings and feeling overwhelmed, but those that want a particular feel to the controls have the option to adjust until they are content.

    Furthermore, the game features a 'firing range' practice space wherein players can practice and tweak their settings in a pressure free environment. It has a robust set of options for players to fiddle with, with both advanced and regular look settings that players can make adjustments to. It's perhaps lacking the degree of control over response curves that Apex has, but it does have a neat option to normalise your sensitivity across ads and non-ads camera movement which is likely valuable to some players.

    Furthermore, there's a firing range style practice space for players to get comfortable and tweak their settings without pressure. Unlike some other games in this list, battlefield also has a tonne of different aiming conditions to consider. Is the player in a tank? A turret?

    A plane? And so forth. So it's great that the options allow the player to get into the detail of all of that. Some of the language used in the settings is a little obtuse though, with terms like 'uniform soldier aiming' as a setting, as well as a 'coefficient slider' but these do come with pretty good descriptions.

    Call of Duty Cold War Like the games listed above, this game features a good set of default options and an advanced set of control options. It's definitely lacking more of the advanced options than Apex and Battlefield, which leaves it a little behind, but it does have the essential settings such as deadzone adjustment and also features some options that the other titles don't, such as allowing players to adjust their style of aim assist.

    And unfortunately, that's about it. I was going to include Overwatch in the list of games that do it right because on paper I think it fits the part, but the response curve options always feel 'off' to me and I think the settings they offer are a little intuitive, with terms like 'dual zone' and 'exponential ramp' flying around.

    Giving Controllers a Bad Name I think there's a common perception that controls will be bad, or even should be bad because of the very fact, that you're using a controller.

    The sentiment that 'Controllers are bad for shooters, so what did you expect? I think in some cases, this even leads to developers dismissing the idea that they can achieve good results with the how the game feels to play on a controller.

    However, irrespective of how you feel about playing games on a controller, what we absolutely do know is that they can be a whole lot better to play with the right configuration and settings. Why is this happening? I'm not completely clueless as to why this type of thing is happening and I do have a number of suggestions that can be the cause, so I'll go ahead and discuss some of these below.

    Often, sorting out the controls for controller falls onto one person. In many cases a studio will only allocate one, or sometimes two members of staff for how the game feels. In theory this is okay, because if that person does a good job in that role, then that's going to have a good end-result. But in reality, that puts a lot of risk on a very small number of people. What if the controller guy doesn't actually know what a game on controller should feel like? What if they aren't altogether familiar with many of the latest releases, how they control, and what options they have for controller adjustment?

    Often the games feel and controls aren't assigned as a central objective for playtesting.

    NACON Revolution Unlimited Pro Controller (PS4/PC) Review

    Additionally, you also get some NACON stickers, a few small sheets telling you to download the software and how to troubleshoot if the wireless connection drops, and a handy cleaning cloth. So, unlike the first variant of the controller in the series, the Pro utilises USB-C the original one had a proprietary cable and comes with a three-meter cable! Physical Customisations Just like the previous two iterations of the controller, the NACON Revolution Unlimited Pro comes with various weights which you can place within the hand grips in order to make the controller as heavy as you wish.

    Personally, I always put the heaviest weights within mine as I like the controller to feel solid and weighty in my hands whilst I use it, but there are various different weights for you to use. Next, we have the Thumbstick shafts. Now, these are interesting, you can pull off both Thumbstick heads carefully and the small metal shaft which connects the head to the base also pops out.

    This can be swapped for either a 30, 38 or degree shaft. Finally, you can swap out the heads for either concave or convex styles. You get two of each, with the concave heads having grips within them and the convex ones being plain one of them has the NACON name on it.

    However, even without the use of third party grips, the various heads all offer a great amount of support and never slipped or became hard to use should my hands get clammy during long gaming sessions. However, if you switch to the advanced mode either PS4 or PC , then you can swap between four programmable profiles via a button on the back of the controller. All you need to do is download the software off the NACON website for both PC or Mac OS and connect your controller to your PC in order to open up a multitude of digital customisations… The basic customisation you can perform is simply remapping all of your buttons upon the controller.

    You can remap every single button, bar the PS, Options and Share buttons. The NACON Revolution Unlimited Pro Controller also comes with four additional buttons upon the rear of the device, near where your fingers rest upon gameplay, which can also be customised to an operation such as a face button, Thumbstick click, or even the touchpad button.

    My first issue with the controller was the placement of these additional buttons. The first iteration of the controller had them higher up and in an easier to use position, this controller initially felt cumbersome and hard to use them. However, after a few hours, my hands began to become accustomed to the design of the layout and I can now use them perfectly without any bother.

    However, those with small hands may have difficulty utilising the position of these whilst also operating the standard controller buttons. Simply hold the Profile button, push one of the new buttons then the button you wish to map to it.

    The main reason I had to have this controller! Technically, all games should have the option — but until then, this controller fixes the issue perfectly. Advertisements Voice chat controls.

    Other features of the Controller So, aside from the standard features and the brilliant invert y-axis option , does the controller have any other built-in functions? As this controller is designed with Pro Players in mind, this feature is perfect for those who game online a lot and require quick access to these options should their headset not have them covered. Also, it means you can adjust them without taking your hands off your controller in order to press said buttons upon your headset — yet another advantage!

    Finally, yet another essential reason to purchase this controller, should you be looking for a Pro Controller on the PS4; wireless mode! You can even use multiple controllers with multiple dongles, as long as you bend the dongles apart from each other.

    To put it simply, you can utilise all of the digital customisations with zero lag either wired into your device via a USB-C cable or wirelessly using the provided dongle. You have to either start it up with another controller first or press the power button manually. Also, I found I was getting around seven to eight hours of battery life on a full charge when using the controller wirelessly.

    I would have liked a lightbar with a toggle to turn it on or off in order to preserve battery. This may only be an issue to those of us with big hands but the triggers are pointed within their design. A great controller. The stand-out feature for me is the ability to invert the y-axis of your Thumbsticks at a hardware level and save it as a profile, this means I no longer have to give up playing a game should it launch with no official invert support.

    With its large selection of physical and digital customisations, the NACON Revolution Unlimited Pro Controller can be fully adapted to your own playstyle and preferences, it takes gaming to a whole new level and beyond!

    PS I Love(d) You – Jak & Daxter – The Precursor Legacy

    The bonus levels are packed with these bonuses, so make sure to play those!

    Why do so many shooters (especially open world) have awful controls?

    Carrot King Pickup 25 carrots found underneath breakable blocks. Carrots can be found in all levels random drops so make sure you keep an eye out for them. The same but different Clear the respective starting zone using each character. Simply change your color times by interacting with the paint blocks. Gold digger Find the crown bonus in the treasure chest.

    Make sure to pick it up for this trophy to pop. Stay away from Bonuses Try not to collect bonuses in a level. Earned when you defeat the first boss. Simply complete any 3 levels in a row without losing a life. This can be easy farmed in the bonus levels, as these have little to none hazards.

    Finally, you can swap out the heads for either concave or convex styles. You get two of each, with the concave heads having grips within them and the convex ones being plain one of them has the NACON name on it. However, even without the use of third party grips, the various heads all offer a great amount of support and never slipped or became hard to use should my hands get clammy during long gaming sessions. However, if you switch to the advanced mode either PS4 or PCthen you can swap between four programmable profiles via a button on the back of the controller.

    All you need to do is download the software off the NACON website for both PC or Mac OS and connect your controller to your PC in order to open up a multitude of digital customisations… The basic customisation you can perform is simply remapping all of your buttons upon the controller. You can remap every single button, bar the PS, Options and Share buttons. The NACON Revolution Unlimited Pro Controller also comes with four additional buttons upon the rear of the device, near where your fingers rest upon gameplay, which can also be customised to an operation such as a face button, Thumbstick click, or even the touchpad button.

    My first issue with the controller was the placement of these additional buttons. The first iteration of the controller had them higher up and in an easier to use position, this controller initially felt cumbersome and hard to use them. However, after a few hours, my hands began to become accustomed to the design of the layout and I can now use them perfectly without any bother. However, those with small hands may have difficulty utilising the position of these whilst also operating the standard controller buttons.

    A turret?

    GTA Remastered Controls Patch v2 released for PSVita/PSTV

    A plane? And so forth. So it's great that the options allow the player to get into the detail of all of that. Some of the language used in the settings is a little obtuse though, with terms like 'uniform soldier aiming' as a setting, as well as a 'coefficient slider' but these do come with pretty good descriptions.

    Call of Duty Cold War Like the games listed above, this game features a good set of default options and an advanced set of control options. It's definitely lacking more of the advanced options than Apex and Battlefield, which leaves it a little behind, but it does have the essential settings such as deadzone adjustment and also features some options that the other titles don't, such as allowing players to adjust their style of aim assist.

    And unfortunately, that's about it. I was going to include Overwatch in the list of games that do it right because on paper I think it fits the part, but the response curve options always feel 'off' to me and I think the settings they offer are a little intuitive, with terms like 'dual zone' and 'exponential ramp' flying around. Giving Controllers a Bad Name I think there's a common perception that controls will be bad, or even should be bad because of the very fact, that you're using a controller.

    The sentiment that 'Controllers are bad for shooters, so what did you lateral irrigation system cost I think in some cases, this even leads to developers dismissing the idea that they can achieve good results with the how the game feels to play on a controller.

    However, irrespective of how you feel about playing games on a controller, what we absolutely do know is that they can be a whole lot better to play with the right configuration and settings. Why is this happening? I'm not completely clueless as to why this type of thing is happening and I do have a number of suggestions that can be the cause, so I'll go ahead and discuss some of these below.

    Often, sorting out the controls for controller falls onto one person. In many cases a studio will only allocate one, or sometimes two members of staff for how the game feels. In theory this is okay, because if that person does a good job in that role, then that's going to have a good end-result.

    But in reality, that puts a lot of risk on a very small number of people. What if the controller guy doesn't actually know what a game on controller should feel like?

    What if they aren't altogether familiar with many of the latest releases, how they control, and what options they have for controller adjustment? Often the games feel and controls aren't assigned as a central objective for playtesting. I've seen this first hand in games that control poorly, it's often simply an assumption that the games controls are 'good' and that that area of the game doesn't need to be the focus of inquiry for user testing.

    Additionally, players in user tests are somewhat accepting of the games unfinished state, so it's likely that they don't expect to be able to do things like customise the controls or for the controls to feel quite right at that early stage. A lot of people don't 'feel it'. Likely due to the level of familiarity they have and expectations set by other games, only some people seem to notice when the controls have a high deadzone or input lag hey Stadia advocates.

    Additionally, it's rare that anyone on a development team has any type of disability that would warrant an advanced level of customisation of the controls. With that said, just because people don't feel something or know how to describe their experiences with that thing, doesn't mean it doesn't affect them.

    For instance my partner noted that The Witcher 3 was pretty hard, and found it difficult to get Geralt to do what she wanted to at times. I showed her the 'alternative movement controls' in the menu, and her experience was improved. She couldn't put her finger on the issue and only described the symptom increased difficulty as a result of finding it difficult to move Geralt where she wanted to in combat.

    It's also not altogether common that people in game dev necessarily play a lot of other games, with a lot of folks finding that they want to get away from their work. For instance a friend of mine works at Codemasters and therefore he gave me a copy of Dirt 5, I asked him to play it with me, and he did for an hour or two, but after which he asked if we could please play anything but racing games because that's all he sees all day at work.

    Talking Points I just wanted to vent about this really because it's incredibly frustrating to pick up a game and find it controls poorly, especially when the solution to many of those issues feels plainly obvious. So thanks for hearing me out, and here are some talking points to help guide discussion Feel free to share similar experiences with games wherein the camera controls have undermined the experience, particularly when using a controller.

    Gem Smashers Trophy Guide

    Other than that, feel free to talk over any of the issues I've raised in this thread. Let me know if you agree or disagree with my view on any of these games and what you think the issues are. As always, remain polite.


    thoughts on “Saints row 3 remastered ps4 controller inverted

    • 15.09.2021 at 03:05
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    • 18.09.2021 at 22:21
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