Examples of stereotypes in movies and tv shows


  • What Hollywood movies do to perpetuate racial stereotypes
  • How Stereotypes in Movies and on TV Impact Kids’ Development [downloadable]
  • Around the World in 80 Stereotypes: Images of the MENA Region in Hollywood
  • Asian Representation in Movies: Best and Worst Examples Through the Years
  • Stereotypes in Movies and How Filmmakers Can Avoid Them
  • screenrant.com
  • 23 Female Stereotypes in Movies That Need to Stop
  • What Hollywood movies do to perpetuate racial stereotypes

    While stereotypes can be helpful for making quick decisions based on past experiences, they can also mislead us by thinking something is true about a person just because they belong to a certain group or look and act a certain way.

    Children are affected by the stereotypes they see and hear in media. How can media contribute to stereotypes? Many media such as TV shows, movies, and music use stereotypes in order to tell a story.

    Sometimes these stereotypes are wrong and reinforce false beliefs about how people belonging to a certain group look, think and behave. This can affect how children feel about people and how they treat them. Researchers have looked into links between stereotypes in media and how people think and act and have found the following: Age old people, young people, teenagers.

    There are many different stereotypes about age in the media, such as showing old people as nice but lacking skills, or teens as rebellious partiers.

    Studies show that these stereotypes can influence how children behave and think about aging. Gender male, female, transgender. Stereotypes of what it means to be male, female, gay, straight, transgender, or non-binary can be found in most media aimed at children and adolescence. Examples include advertisements which rely on using colors to show products aimed at boys blue and girls pink , sexist video games that reinforce sexism, or shows that portray homosexual characters as flamboyant.

    Research shows that gender stereotypes can affect how children feel they should act, look, and even what they can be when they grow up. Jobs doctors, teachers, models. Culture and Race. Stereotypes are often used in media to describe or show people belonging to specific ethnic or cultural groups. Research shows that these portrayals can affect how children think and behave towards people based on their skin color and racial identity —including children who are diverse.

    What YOU Can Do Although stereotypes are in nearly all forms of media, limiting the amount of media children are exposed to that contain negative and incorrect representations of people can help them learn to get to know others first before making assumptions about them based on how they look or act.

    Discussing stereotypes that children see, read or hear in media can also help children learn how to recognize them and understand that real people are more complex.

    What you can do is limit their exposure to negative and incorrect stereotypes by choosing media that do not rely on them to tell a story. Practice media literacy Teaching children to think critically about media can help them question and understand why people and groups of people are represented in a certain way.

    Encourage children to point out and discuss the stereotypes they find, especially when they go against what they know from personal experience. Learning how to recognize and deconstruct stereotypes can help children learn to judge people for who they really are, not just based on how they look, how much money they have or other singular qualities. Check out resources MediaSmarts for additional information and tools. Be a media role model Be aware of media you are using when your child is with you.

    Understand that even if your child may not understand the content, the stereotypes may still affect her. Parents should model for their children the behaviors they would like to encourage, including pointing out and talking about stereotypes, and by turning off or avoiding media stereotypes when children are present.

    By keeping these electronics in a common area, parents can monitor their use much more easily and be aware of how much media their children are using and if the content is developmentally appropriate. Other Health Effects.

    How Stereotypes in Movies and on TV Impact Kids’ Development [downloadable]

    It is published as part of our mission to showcase peer-leading papers written by students during their studies. Spectators flocked to the cinemas and accompanied the protagonists as they travelled through multiple countries, including France, Turkey, India and China. Though evidently works of fiction, such films leave the spectator with certain impressions of places and cultures that they may never have actually experienced. This should not be underestimated, especially in light of the close relationship that has existed between the White House and Hollywood since the first studio was founded in Pertinently, the White House has called upon the services of Hollywood in times of war and crisis, including the declaration of the War on Terror by G.

    Bush in Since then, the MENA region has been thrust into the forefront of the American media, and it is no mere coincidence that a greater number of MENA characters feature in Hollywood productions from onwards.

    This is significant given that media and foreign policy mutually influence one another. With American troops withdrawing from Iraq after almost a decade, the representations presented and re-produced have and will have a real-world impact on both regions. This study is interdisciplinary, drawing upon four areas of study, namely, orientalism, geopolitics, film studies and sociolinguistics, taking orientalism as the primary lens through which to interpret results.

    The next section, section 2, reviews the main literature produced in this field, identifying the gap which is addressed in the present study. In section 3, the research questions are established. Section 4 presents the wider theoretical framework within which this study is situated. Section 5 outlines the methodology used and section 6 constitutes the analysis. Finally, section 7 presents the conclusions. Otherness-oriented research has been conducted in multiple areas, including race and ethnic relations.

    In one such example, Dokotum extensively studies Hollywood film productions between and in which Africa is consistently presented as a homogeneous entity. On a national level, Greco Larson gives a broad overview of the representation of minority groups in American news, film and television.

    This book analyses the representation of the Latino, Black, Native American and Asian American populations, showing racial inequality is justified. Whilst Shaheen , , and Jhally serve as excellent referential works, covering a huge breadth of representations in film and other media, they lack depth and detailed analysis as the sheer scope of these studies allow for the dedication of just a few lines to each film analysed.

    In more recent studies, numerous scholars have built upon the ideas of Shaheen, focusing on smaller selections of cultural productions from his inventories in order to carry out more detailed analyses.

    In a similar vein, Adams , carries out a qualitative content analysis of Arab and Muslim women in the television series Homeland, concluding that Islam is depicted as irreconcilable with American values, thus the series reinforces islamophobia.

    Consequently, specific events are interpreted differently in Hollywood and Arab cinemas, for instance, portrayals of the Arab-Israeli conflict. The book considers the questions of space, gender, nationalism, conflict and fundamentalism in films produced in eight countries between He found that Hollywood dismissed the cultural citizenship of Arab Americans and constantly questioned their allegiance and belonging.

    A number of interesting studies have also been published on language use in film and other media. Ibrahim Shousha , in a critical discourse analysis of the image of Arabs in the American Press, analyses themes and frames in the selected articles and indicates that the linguistic features employed reinforce a negative image of Arabs as well as unequal power relations.

    While the printed press offers a descriptive, third party assessment of the MENA region, other media, such as film, go one step further: screenwriters quite literally put words into the mouths of their fictional creations. Film constitutes a higher-impact, multisensory visual and aural and emotive medium.

    Rahimi and Amiran argue that in numerous productions, Iranians are consistently portrayed as cruel enemies as a reflection of the political climate. While both studies present interesting findings, critical discourse analysis can be considered a highly subjective and insufficiently rigorous approach Breeze , For example, in only analysing selected articles and scenes, many instances of language use will have been overlooked.

    Furthermore, linguistic analysis of scripted media should not be limited to what is spoken but should also consider how it is spoken. It is important to recognise that screenwriters not only choose the words uttered by their creations, but also their paralinguistic communication, such as pronunciation and tone, and extralinguistic communication, such as expressions and gestures.

    This too conveys key information to the spectator and is an important area of study. This is often realised by means of a foreign language or accented English. Bleichenbacher considers whether Hollywood films perpetuate patterns of negative stereotyping with regards to speakers of other languages in general. Using a corpus of 28 language contact films from a range of genres produced between and , he examines whether being multilingual grants characters more or less power.

    Tayyara notes that the use of Arabic in film has increased since the late s and examines the representations of Arab-Muslims through use of the Arabic language as a sociolinguistic marker between and Studies on representations of the MENA region tend to focus on physical appearance and narrative. A small number of scholars have approached the topic of linguistic representations of the MENA region, though they use highly subjective Critical Discourse Analysis and focus almost exclusively on limited examples of content, omitting important extralinguistic and paralinguistic features.

    Conversely, extensive research exists on language use in animation films, which highlight interesting tendencies with regards to stereotype reinforcements. The present study addresses this gap. Based on research carried out on accent, dialect and language use in animation films, this article employs similar techniques to analyse MENA representations in films produced between and — a turbulent period with regards to US foreign relations regarding many countries in said region.

    Given the significance of the language varieties used in animation films to convey meaning, it is important to consider how Hollywood film producers use linguistic expression in the creation of their characters and by extension, their constructed image of the MENA region.

    Bush administrations Said uses the term Orient a Eurocentric label for the same geographical space , which he suggests is an almost European invention Said Although Israel is geographically integral to the region, it is excluded primarily due to its unique and close relationship with the USA, but also its evident religious and ideological distinctions from the rest of the region. This study uses the consecutive G.

    Bush mandates as the selected timeframe, given the widely acknowledged collaboration between Hollywood and the US government, and the political significance of certain MENA countries during this period Dodds a. The timely contact between Bush and Hollywood representatives in was widely criticised as it coincided with the declaration of the War on Terror, indicating that the industry would be used to popularise the US military campaign.

    A sociolinguistic analysis is therefore carried out which analyses all images of the MENA region that feature in the highest-grossing box office films in the USA between and A range of linguistic features, such as accent, foreign language use, multilingualism and silence, will be analysed. Though it is important to recognise the exportation of Hollywood films, and consequently the translation of the linguistic features attached to these images both in subtitles and dubbing the present study focuses on a North American viewership and translation will not be examined in the present study, though would make for an interesting future investigation.

    The present study poses the following questions: Which stereotypical images occur most frequently in the selected films? Which language varieties are assigned to these images? Is there any correlation between these language varieties and motivation? What does the linguistic expression of these images communicate to the spectator? Theoretical Framework In order to contextualise the reading of the selected films, the present research draws on different areas of study to construct a theoretical framework.

    Whilst there are many appropriate and relevant fields, this study will be situated primarily in the field of orientalism. The four most relevant fields to be explored in this section are: orientalism, popular geopolitics, film studies and sociolinguistics. He claims that interest in the popular dimensions of geopolitics increased considerably in thanks in part to the declaration of the War on Terror and given the timely contact between the president G.

    Bush and representatives from Hollywood studios. Given its status as the dominant Western superpower, representations and images produced by the USA must be scrutinised, taking global political concerns into account.

    In this vein, popular geopolitics has been applied by a number of scholars to cinema. Saunders considers propaganda and the theme of imperialism in contemporary global politics as represented in the science fiction genre. Saunders analyses fears of globalisation and loss of border control in the zombie subgenre. Whilst it is necessary to acknowledge this approach, this study focuses specifically on representations of the MENA region and does not enter into a detailed discussion of the wider political context, therefore it is deemed more appropriate to apply an orientalism lens.

    Europe and the Orient share a long history, the latter having played a key role in defining the former as its contrasting image. In the case of the USA, however, such a historical connection does not exist, rather it has inherited a European and Eurocentric view of the Orient. Said criticises principal orientalist thinkers and argues that trends of orientalism present themselves in many disciplines.

    In section 2 literature review of the present study, Ibrahim Shousa also uses orientalism as a theoretical frame in her thesis on the image of Arabs in the American press. Film semiotics examines how meaning is conveyed in film, both denotatively literally and connotatively implicitly Metz, This study focuses on connotative aspects, i.

    The objective of screen theory is to understand how media cinema can compel us to adopt certain beliefs and identities, arguing that the spectacle creates the spectator, not the other way around. This theory approaches how form, that is editing techniques, prepares a predetermined subject-position for the spectator. Thus, a sociolinguistic frame is required in order to establish basic concepts before applying them to the analysis presented in section 6.

    Individuals socially evaluate an interlocutor based on voice from the first instance, deducing different kinds of images from ethnicity to personality to socioeconomic status. This is an important starting point given that film producers seek to play upon this phenomenon in character creation, recreating the same effect in scripted language production, thereby eliciting the desired reaction from the spectator and drawing them into the narrative.

    Chapter 7 presents a quantitative analysis of language varieties used in animation films, categorising characters according to language variety, motivations, gender, setting, etc. Methodology 5. Whilst the two are not necessarily linked, it is important to consider that there were a greater number of cinemagoers paying to watch Hollywood films during this period of direct conflict with certain groups in the MENA region.

    This study focuses on the period, during which time the lowest number of tickets — This is still a significant quantity and does not imply that the reach of Hollywood diminished as the number of tickets sold rose again in He argues that the stereotypical images of Arabs in Hollywood are not only constantly reproduced, but are also the only images produced, leading to a general homogenisation of the Arab world and its people.

    Given that these films are viewed by millions of spectators in North America alone, a large part of which are American voters, the images proliferated by Hollywood have a real political influence. This becomes even more significant if the impact of US foreign policy in almost all parts of the world is taken into account.

    Furthermore, these cinematographic productions do not fall into oblivion after production, but rather endure for generations in the form of DVDs and streaming services, not to mention illegal downloading.

    Therefore, films continue to relate the same images and messages long after production and initial reception. In terms of social perception, stereotyping is a useful social tool which draws upon previous information in order to categorise people and people groups Rosch, It is a problem-solving strategy which maximises the information obtained whilst requiring a minimum expenditure of effort.

    Stereotypes are usually based on the most salient characteristics of race, gender and age. They therefore function as a lens through which different groups perceive each other. This principle applies not only to the real world, but also to representations of it. Stereotyping, therefore, constitutes a danger as it can lead to discrimination and have a very real impact on the personal and professional lives of certain communities.

    Language is a powerful social practice and has been employed frequently in the creation of stereotypes in film and other media. Dragojevic et al. More specifically, when the only experience individuals have with different ethnic groups is through media, there is a higher chance of stereotype formation since the media tend to present just one version of events that will often be generalized to the entire group.

    One common image is that of wealthy sheikhs who control oil wells.

    Around the World in 80 Stereotypes: Images of the MENA Region in Hollywood

    Scenes of religiosity may be used to depict characters as rigidly devoted at the expense of certain rights and freedoms. Students can consider how people look and are dressed, how they get around, and what insights they share in the scene. Again, there is diversity in terms of regional development that can be noted. After gathering the responses, give a more accurate insight into the modernity of the Middle East.

    Who are the good guys? Facial features, skin tones, and accents should be considered. What do they talk about?

    Asian Representation in Movies: Best and Worst Examples Through the Years

    What are their moods and attitudes? Do they speak English? A dialect? How is religion acknowledged and woven into the scenes? Honest, angry, loving, crazed, kind, strict, fun-loving, violent, sneaky, funny? What about the women? What do they look like and what role do they play? Are they active in the scene or in the background?

    Allow the class to discuss what value judgments underlie the use of these stereotypes in the film s they watched. Ask students to give examples of similar stereotypes of Middle Easterners or other groups used in other commercial films or other media. How do the depictions change across time and throughout different films or series?

    Stereotypes in Movies and How Filmmakers Can Avoid Them

    Relate to other instances of harmful misrepresentations in the media. Why do they think filmmakers rely upon stereotypes in their films? How or how not is this effective storytelling? Hence, showing all American-Indians as worshippers of the idols of Hindu gods and goddesses, complete with Hindu-style offerings and incense sticks is just generalizing Indians under one category.

    Further, even with the Hindu Indians, not all of them are intensely devout believers. Just like the generic and dominant American Christian characters in popular media, some might be of stronger faith while some might hardly worship their deities at all.

    The root cause of this was racial ignorance and the earlier depictions of Indians by white actors wearing brownface like Peter Sellers in The Party and Fisher Stevens in Short Circuit. Of course, the stereotypical 'Indian accent' reached disastrous heights with the character Apu in The Simpsons.

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    Apu was so offensive to the diaspora that even a documentary called The Problem With Apu got released indissecting the stereotypes and racial microaggressions the character presented. Actor Kal Penn even revealed how some studios wanted him to have an 'authentic Apu accent' in his roles! Recently, Apu's voice actor Hank Azaria apologized and stepped down from the role. Some films like Lion have tried showing a financially-troubled protagonist in a realistic light and empathetic light.

    23 Female Stereotypes in Movies That Need to Stop

    But otherwise, foreign films often tend to romanticize poverty or show 'poverty porn' as some might say or paint the entirety of India as a backward nation with no modern infrastructure. The Darjeeling LimitedMillion Dollar Arm, and many others mock and generalize Indian cities as having nothing but shoddy shacks of buildings and half-naked children. Indian directors frame their scenes in the backdrops of ruined buildings, crowded streets, and cows in the middle of traffic, but they paint the context as being from a particular area in India, rather than generalizing the entire country as an undeveloped urban jungle.

    Lion and Million Dollar Arm both depict white characters turning the fates of poor Indians. Both are based on true stories and do justice to their source material to an extent. However, Indian representation should also involve portrayals of self-independent characters who can make it on their own, rather than depending on white people all the time. Examples include advertisements which rely on using colors to show products aimed at boys blue and girls pinksexist video games that reinforce sexism, or shows that portray homosexual characters as flamboyant.

    Research shows that gender stereotypes can affect how children feel they should act, look, and even what they can be when they grow up. Jobs doctors, teachers, models. Culture and Race. Stereotypes are often used in media to describe or show people belonging to specific ethnic or cultural groups. Research shows that these portrayals can affect how children think and behave towards people based on their skin color and racial identity —including children who are diverse.

    What YOU Can Do Although stereotypes are in nearly all forms of media, limiting the amount of media children are exposed to that contain negative and incorrect representations of people can help them learn to get to know others first before making assumptions about them based on how they look or act. Discussing stereotypes that children see, read or hear in media can also help children learn how to recognize them and understand that real people are more complex.

    What you can do is limit their exposure to negative and incorrect stereotypes by choosing media that do not rely on them to tell a story.


    thoughts on “Examples of stereotypes in movies and tv shows

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    • 08.09.2021 at 22:01
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