5 months postpartum yellow discharge


  • My baby has a sticky eye
  • Postpartum Bleeding: What You Need to Know About Lochia
  • 6 Ways To Successfully Manage Postpartum Incontinence
  • 17 mind-blowing ways your body changes after giving birth
  • Everything You Wanted To Know: Postpartum Bleeding
  • My baby has a sticky eye

    Masterson, because it's made up of the same kind of blood and tissue. But lochia happens on a much larger scale because of how big the uterus grows during pregnancy.

    The discharge after birth also lasts a lot longer than a normal period , and it goes through a few changes before finally stopping. What Does Lochia Look Like? In the first days and weeks after delivery , lochia looks very similar to period blood; it's bright red in color and the flow can be fairly heavy. You might need to wear thicker maternity pads, and it's possible you may pass a small piece of placenta or what looks like tissue along with the blood.

    After the first two weeks, Masterson says the color of your lochia will change from red to dark brown and will decrease in volume; eventually, it may become yellow and watery. You may also begin bleeding more irregularly rather than having a consistent flow all the time.

    Usually, lochia lasts for about six to eight weeks, so as long as you're within that window and your lochia is gradually decreasing in volume, it's probably normal.

    If you're bleeding abnormally after delivery, there's several possible reasons. You could have a vaginal tear or bladder hemorrhage meaning the blood isn't actually coming from your uterus , or even a previously undiagnosed bleeding disorder, says Dr.

    Additionally, there could be an issue with the overall contraction of your uterus. Magneson says. Is My Postpartum Bleeding Normal? When to Call the Doctor You can always ask your doctor about your lochia during your six-week postpartum checkup if you have any concerns. There are some red flags, though: Passing clots after birth, for example, is completely normal. But extra-large blood clots after birth the size of a grapefruit should be monitored.

    Fever, severe pain or cramping that lasts more than a few days after delivery, and foul-smelling lochia are warning signs of infection, says Dr. You should also contact your doctor if you have to change your pad more than once per hour because it's soaked through with blood.

    For this reason, Dr. Magneson notes that it's important to pay attention to how many sanitary pads you are changing throughout the day, as well as how much bleeding you notice each time you use the bathroom. By Sarah Bradley.

    Postpartum Bleeding: What You Need to Know About Lochia

    Postpartum care 17 mind-blowing ways your body changes after giving birth Pregnancy and childbirth transform your body—sometimes in weird and not-so-wonderful ways. Giving birth is deeply awesome, but giving yourself the tools and time to restore your nutrient levels, hormones, muscles and everything else is going to affect how you experience the early days of motherhood.

    Thyroid hormones, which help regulate body temperature, metabolism and organ function, can be affected by giving birth, too.

    Symptoms can include insomnia, anxiety, rapid heart rate, fatigue, weight loss and irritability one to four months after birth or fatigue, weight gain, constipation, dry skin and depression four to eight months after birth. Your doctor can monitor your thyroid levels with blood tests and prescribe medication if necessary. Check this out: In one small study in New Haven, Conn. Seriously, how cool is this?

    During pregnancy, your body makes a hormone called relaxin, which makes all of your joints looser. It can take up to five months for joints to return to their earlier stability, so stick to lower-impact exercise if your joints are sore.

    Relaxin combined with weight gain during pregnancy may make your feet slightly bigger and your arches a bit flatter, sometimes permanently. Your hips may stay wider, too.

    Vitamin and mineral levels Feeling shaky and exhausted is pretty common in the first few weeks after delivery hello, multiple wake ups every night , but these symptoms can also be linked to low iron levels.

    Plus, eat iron-rich foods, such as red meat, fortified whole-grain products, beans, lentils and leafy greens. You should feel better within a couple of weeks of boosting your iron intake, but more severe deficiencies indicated by shortness of breath, pale skin, dizziness, a swollen tongue, cold hands and feet or cravings to eat non-food items like ice cubes may take longer to sort out. You can ask your doctor to order a blood test to check your iron levels.

    Breasts Those bras you bought when you were pregnant? Right after giving birth, estrogen and progesterone levels drop, and prolactin, the hormone that helps you make breastmilk, kicks in. This change usually makes your breasts even bigger than they were during pregnancy, because of increased blood flow and milk, and yes, this is the engorgement your friends warned you about. It peaks two to three days after birth, and your breasts will be pretty hard and sore.

    Applying warm packs before breastfeeding and cold packs afterwards, as well as taking a mild anti-inflammatory such as ibuprofen, which is safe during breastfeeding , expressing a bit of milk in the shower or tucking a clean, slightly crushed cabbage leaf against your breast all help, says CJ Blennerhassett, a Toronto midwife. As for your eventual after-pregnancy boob size—who knows?

    Your breasts could stay bigger, get smaller or revert to their pre-pregnancy size. While recovery from a vaginal delivery versus a C-section will pose different challenges , there are also many similarities: Afterpains, which feel like menstrual cramps, begin shortly after you deliver and last for two or three days. These contractions help your uterus start to shrink to its pre-baby state. Over about six weeks, your uterus contracts to its original size, eventually lowering itself behind the pubic bone.

    This helps flatten your tummy, as well. That blood and mucus, which becomes lighter in colour and flow over time, comes from an area about the size of your hand, where the placenta was attached to your uterine muscle, says Blennerhassett.

    Similarly, a C-section means a puffy belly and painful incision. Both will gradually get better over several weeks. Rest and painkillers are your friends. You can also soothe your sore and stitched perineum the area between your vulva and anus with a sitz bath or by tucking a frozen maxi-pad sprayed with witch hazel into your undies. A sitz bath can help ease hemorrhoids, which can develop during the pushing part of labour.

    New pain, blood or discharge means you need to talk to your healthcare provider pronto so you can be checked for infection. Your perineum or abdomen should be healed at the six-week mark whew. If this is the case, a pelvic health physiotherapist can teach you how to massage the incision site to promote circulation and healing.

    Not that you miss it, but when will your period come back? Once you start nursing less, usually around the six-month mark, your period may start up again, but the timing varies from person to person. And just a reminder: You ovulate the month before your period returns. Belly, bladder, bowels and pelvic floor Stuff you take for granted, like going to the bathroom, may not go as planned. Cold compresses or a warm sitz bath can help. On the other hand, you may be peeing or sweating a ton in the first week or two after delivery, as your body adjusts to changing hormones and works to get rid of excess fluid.

    Pee can also sting your sore bottom, which is why your nurse or midwife likely gave you a super handy squirt bottle. Fill it with warm water to spray your perineum while you pee. Trust us. Postpartum constipation is pretty common in the first week or so, because of dehydration, the side effects of pain meds, having a C-section abdominal surgery puts the bowels on quiet mode and a fear of pushing anything else out of that tender area of your body.

    Your doctor or midwife may also prescribe a stool softener. Take it! Again, trust us. The pelvic floor involves the muscles, ligaments, tissues and nerves that support your uterus, bladder, vagina and rectum. The weight of your baby, plus labour and delivery, can put a lot of stress on it. The good news is a pelvic health physiotherapist can help with that; the bad news is pelvic floor physio is usually not covered by provincial health plans.

    Bladder incontinence is most common, but occasionally fecal incontinence leaking poo can be an issue. Or a damaged pelvic floor can cause a prolapse, which is a weakened spot in the vaginal wall that allows the bladder, rectum or uterus to drop out of position; symptoms include frequent peeing or pee leaks , pain during sex or a feeling of pressure in your groin. We know it sounds a little or a lot scary, but physio can teach you how to strengthen your pelvic floor so it can do its supportive job again.

    After birth, your core muscles can be weak, meaning it may be surprisingly hard to, say, lift a box of diapers out of the grocery cart. Diastasis recti aside, lots of women end up with a softer, floppier tummy, and how it firms up in the months after birth varies, depending on your genetics, posture and how much the skin and tissues stretched while you were pregnant.

    The way your body changes after you have your baby is much like parenting itself: bizarre, awesome, frustrating, cool and inspiring—and it can help to remember that almost everything does get better with time. Your body grew a person, and there are endless ways it can bounce back and surprise you. Compression socks or leggings can help ease pain from varicose veins in the early days after delivery.

    Your face Changing hormone levels can affect your facial skin, causing dry patches, acne or pigmentation. For regular acne, benzoyl peroxide is considered the safest choice but salicylic acid may also be recommended. High hormone levels during pregnancy cause you to grow more hair over the nine months. When hormone levels drop after birth, you lose some luscious locksand start a new phase of growth.

    Noticing slightly blurry vision or dry eyes?

    6 Ways To Successfully Manage Postpartum Incontinence

    And just a reminder: You ovulate the month before your period returns. Belly, bladder, bowels and pelvic floor Stuff you take for granted, like going to the bathroom, may not go as planned.

    Cold compresses or a warm sitz bath can help. On the other hand, you may be peeing or sweating a ton in the first week or two after delivery, as your body adjusts to changing hormones and works to get rid of excess fluid. Pee can also sting your sore bottom, which is why your nurse or midwife likely gave you a super handy squirt bottle. Fill it with warm water to spray your perineum while you pee.

    Trust us. Postpartum constipation is pretty common in the first week or so, because of dehydration, the side effects of pain meds, having a C-section abdominal surgery puts the bowels on quiet mode and a fear of pushing anything else out of that tender area of your body. Your doctor or midwife may also prescribe a stool softener. Take it! Again, trust us. The pelvic floor involves the muscles, ligaments, tissues and nerves that support your uterus, bladder, vagina and rectum.

    The weight of your baby, plus labour and delivery, can put a lot of stress on it. The good news is a pelvic health physiotherapist can help with that; the bad news is pelvic floor physio is usually not covered by provincial health plans. Bladder incontinence is most common, but occasionally fecal incontinence leaking poo can be an issue. Or a damaged pelvic floor can cause a prolapse, which is a weakened spot in the vaginal wall that allows the bladder, rectum or uterus to drop out of position; symptoms include frequent peeing or pee leakspain during sex or a feeling of pressure in your groin.

    We know it sounds a little or a lot scary, but physio can teach you how to strengthen your pelvic floor so it can do its supportive job again. After birth, your core muscles can be weak, meaning it may be surprisingly hard to, say, lift a box of diapers out of the grocery cart.

    17 mind-blowing ways your body changes after giving birth

    Diastasis recti aside, lots of women end up with a softer, floppier tummy, and how it firms up in the months after birth varies, depending on your genetics, posture and how much the skin and tissues stretched while you were pregnant. The way your body changes after you have your baby is much like parenting itself: bizarre, awesome, frustrating, cool and inspiring—and it can help to remember that almost everything does get better with time.

    Your body grew a person, and there are endless ways it can bounce back and surprise you. It is also not unusual for people to feel stronger and more active around this time and to overdo it, causing renewed bleeding. It is a good sign to take it easy for a few days.

    Contact your medical care provider immediately if you are soaking a pad or tampon in less than an hour, if you have a fever or chills, or if you suddenly begin bleeding bright red blood again.

    Everything You Wanted To Know: Postpartum Bleeding

    Menstruation No one wants their period to come back, but it will eventually come back. While is it possible for your cycle to return as early as six weeks postpartum, even those who are not breastfeeding will usually not experience a period until closer to 12 weeks postpartum.

    And remember, you ovulate two weeks before your period! The First Period The first period is usually much heavier and potentially more uncomfortable than you might be used to. The first few periods might also be unpredictable and irregular. All of this is normal as your body sheds the lining built up over a longer period of time and your hormone levels start to settle.

    Lactation-Induced Ovulation Prevention The old wives tale that breastfeeding prevented pregnancy is not completely true. Officially called lactation-induced amenorrheathis method of birth control is not particularly reliable, particularly after any supplement nutrition has been added to the infants routine, including pacifers and solids.

    Physiologically, the act of a baby suckling at the breast reduces certain hormone levels. Specifically, the luteinizing hormone surge that results in ovulation is suppressed.

    However, in order for this to be effective, one must be exclusively breastfeeding with no supplemental or artificial nipple. However, even exclusive breastfeeding and room-sharing will not be enough to prevent the return of their cycle for everyone.

    And because you cannot tell if you have ovulated until two weeks later when your period arrives, this is considered an unreliable form of birth control. How do I know what is normal? It is normal to worry about what your body is doing, especially if this is your first baby! The good news is that most new parents will recover fairly easily. However, there are a few problems that can crop up that should be addressed quickly. The bright red bleeding usually begins tapering down by the end of week one, and is sometimes accompanied by occasional small clots.

    Lochia begins to lessen after the first weeks. The color lightens from bright red to rustier red to pink. The flow decreases from moderate or heavy in the first week I. Experiencing bleeding after lochia has ended can be surprising — especially when not expecting a period yet!

    It is not known why this happens. Other bleeding Occurs within first 6 weeks postpartum Dripping or spotting for days in a row or on and off Light spotting that is only pink or brown and goes away Only occurs with exertion Accompanies urinary symptoms such as irritation or pain with urination Bleeding within first weeks postpartum associated with tender abdomen, fever, chills, malaise Return of bleeding after lochia has ended among exclusively breastfeeding women within first weeks What are other causes of postpartum bleeding?

    This is usually noticed as bleeding with increase in activity in the first 6 weeks.


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