Wallpaper for notch display


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    Thus, it's not surprising that there are plenty of bugs in the final release despite Google beta testing the OS for well over six months. One such bug affecting gamers is related to the dynamic theming engine, which restarts all app activities whenever the wallpaper is switched out. This leads to a scenario where games could crash if your device wallpaper automatically changes in the background.

    As previously detailed , the issue is that changing the wallpaper in Android 12 results in a configuration change forcing all app activities to restart so that they use the new colors from the wallpaper for theming purposes. This configuration change affects games as well despite them not using Material You colors. The bug was first reported on the Google Issue Tracker in mid-September, and despite Google rolling out multiple updates since then, it remains unresolved.

    As per Mishaal Rahman, this issue will be tackled in Android 12L. The fix will ensure that background wallpaper changes will not trigger theme changes or force app activities to restart, thereby preventing crashes.

    Android 12L is primarily meant for foldables, tablets, and devices with a big display, though it will also fix a number of Android 12 annoyances. Google has so far only released the first developer preview of Android 12L , with beta testing for the OS set to commence from December and last until February. The final release is scheduled to go live in early Until then, you can ensure this bug does not hamper your gaming sessions by disabling your automatic wallpaper switching app or increasing the change interval.

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    Apps can plug into the Material You color-changing palettes, too, so even Gmail and the Play Store can be color-coordinated with your wallpaper. Unlike the glacially slow rollout of dark mode across Google's app ecosystem, a number of Google apps already support Material You. Google has the luxury of not caring too much about other branding on Android, and Material You once again falls into Google-centric habits.

    When Google rolled out Material Design 2 in Android 9, it added considerably more customizability at the behest of other brands. Google said it was reacting to feedback that developers "didn't always see Material Design as flexible enough" and that "products from different brands looked too similar. Would Facebook ever allow a green Facebook app? Would Spotify ever allow a blue Spotify app? I don't think so. Hopefully smaller apps adopt the feature, though. Material You also isn't just for Android.

    Eventually, he says the design will roll out across "the web, Chrome OS, Wearables, smart displays, and all of Google's products. Duarte says that someday, the color choices you make with your phone wallpaper "can travel with your account, across every app and every device.

    If you go back to the wallpaper page, you can pick from several color options for a single wallpaper. Ron Amadeo Another option you can try out is "themed icons," which are in beta. When you pick a new wallpaper, you'll have a color option applied, and the wallpaper settings will close. You aren't limited to this first color option, though. If you go back into wallpaper settings, you'll be able to pick from four color palette options and a surprisingly limited collection of "basic" colors.

    The default color options seem to go with a matching color, but the extra color settings will usually offer some striking complementary colors, which look really good. It is extremely fun to flip through wallpapers and see what color combinations Android comes up with.

    I just wish it was easier. The above process is super clunky: you open the wallpaper settings, pick a wallpaper, the wallpaper settings close, you open the wallpaper settings again, and then you can pick a color.

    It would be nice if we could do this all in one trip to the wallpaper settings. It would also be nice if there was more of a preview of what the color options will be for each wallpaper. This color changing comes with some lengthy load times, too, and people with automatic wallpaper switchers have found that you can actually crash a game if it switches in the background.

    Advertisement Another Material You option is "themed icons" for the home screen. This will swap out the normal, multi-colored Android icons for monochrome ones that match the rest of your theme. Currently, this setting is labeled "Beta" on Pixel devices. The problem with themed icons? Not all icons get themed. Also the app drawer never changes, so now you have two sets of icons. The themed icons are kind of weird.

    First, they remove easy user recognition by color. This isn't a huge deal, as Google has been working toward this vision since it started pushing indistinguishable rainbow icons. Compared to the obnoxious multi-colored Google icons with no individuality, turning off all the color is like turning down the noise, and I like it.

    A much weirder component of this change is that the home-screen icons are monochrome, but the app drawer icons are not. So you have two sets of icons to remember and recognize, and it would make way more sense if all the icons, everywhere—in the app drawer and on various app settings screens—all matched.

    The third issue is the usual Android issue: not many apps support these themed icons, so while all the Google ones look nice next to each other, if you add many third-party icons, you'll get a messy mix of colored and monochrome icons.

    The feature feels like an incredible shout-out to the modding community over at sites like XDA, though. Android modders have been doing themed icons for years, with icon packs on third-party launchers. Google is completely reinventing the wheel here, but it's funny that we're back to the consistency goals that the modding community has been chasing down for over a decade.

    If there's anything to learn from the modding community, it's that voluntary consistency will never work! If individual developers all followed the rules, we wouldn't need icon packs in the first place. You've got to let users force this on all apps if you actually want it to happen. Widgets don't follow your accent color and instead pick a color from the exact part of the wallpaper they're on.

    If you move them, they'll change color. A clock rainbow. The other interesting home-screen color effect has to do with widgets, which don't use the accent color and therefore won't match your icons but instead dynamically color themselves based on the wallpaper directly behind them. You can actually move widgets around the screen and see them change color. The most amazing thing about Material You is that it somehow, always, percent of the time, works.

    The color combinations look great and never have a contrast issue. I have maliciously tried to break this by feeding the system crazy wallpapers like fully transparent PNGs, rainbow wallpapers, or wallpapers that aim to cause a contrast issue, and Material You always worked. The only time I've seen even a hint of a system issue is when I eyedropped an accent color from a previous screenshot and set that color as my wallpaper.

    Android 12 responded by dimming the wallpaper slightly so that everything was still readable. The worst thing you can say about any color combination is that it's boring, but you can always jump into the wallpaper settings again and pick a more vibrant color combination. The color system in Android 12 works unbelievably well. It's so much fun to change to a new wallpaper and see what color options will pop up, and I think it's going to be one of Android's most popular, easily marketed features.

    I think it will also lead to more demand for apps that can automatically change your wallpaper so you can get a fresh phone look every day. The power animation fades in and out from the physical power button. Ron Amadeo The idea of a system that automatically themes itself based on your wallpaper, at least to the degree that Android 12 does, sounds like a pipe dream that might be pitched by a designer only concerned about the limited world of their mockups.

    One can imagine the skepticism: "There would be so many edge cases! What if the color combinations look ugly or have contrast issues? It will never work! It sounds terrifying. It's an incredible accomplishment to have the guts to design something like Material You's dynamic color system, to actually make it work, and to ship it out to millions and someday billions of people.

    Now that Google has blazed the trail for dynamic color, this is something I expect most other OS vendors will copy over the next few years. For journalist and developer types who are regularly producing "example" Android materials, Material You also puts us in an interesting predicament: nothing in Android 12 really has a canonical color. Usually, I strive to take uncustomized "neutral" screenshots of the defaults, but that's really not possible here.

    The colors in this article have to be based on whatever wallpaper I have at the time, but unless two users have the same wallpaper, no two versions of Android 12 will look the same.

    Download Notch wallpapers- Hide your Notch now

    It would also be nice if there was more of a preview of what the color options will be for each wallpaper. This color changing comes with some lengthy load times, too, and people with automatic wallpaper switchers have found that you can actually crash a game if it switches in the background.

    Advertisement Another Material You option is "themed icons" for the home screen.

    Download Infinix Hot 11 & 11s Stock Wallpapers (FHD+)

    This will swap out the normal, multi-colored Android icons for monochrome ones that match the rest of your theme. Currently, this setting is labeled "Beta" on Pixel devices. The problem with themed icons? Not all icons get themed.

    Also the app drawer never changes, so now you have two sets of icons. The themed icons are kind of weird. First, they remove easy user recognition by color.

    This isn't a huge deal, as Google has been working toward this vision since it started pushing indistinguishable rainbow icons.

    These weird new iPhone X wallpapers do more than just hide the notch

    Compared to the obnoxious multi-colored Google icons with no individuality, turning off all the color is like turning down the noise, and I like it. A much weirder component of this change is that the home-screen icons are monochrome, but the app drawer icons are not. So you have two sets of icons to remember and recognize, and it would make way more sense if all the icons, everywhere—in the app drawer and on various app settings screens—all matched.

    The third issue is the usual Android issue: not many apps support these themed icons, so while all the Google ones look nice next to each other, if you add many third-party icons, you'll get a messy mix of colored and monochrome icons. The feature feels like an incredible shout-out to the modding community over at sites like XDA, though.

    Android modders have been doing themed icons for years, with icon packs on third-party launchers. Google is completely reinventing the wheel here, but it's funny that we're back to the consistency goals that the modding community has been chasing down for over a decade. If there's anything to learn from the modding community, it's that voluntary consistency will never work! If individual developers all followed the rules, we wouldn't need icon packs in the first place.

    You've got to let users force this on all apps if you actually want it to happen. Widgets don't follow your accent color and instead pick a color from the exact part of the wallpaper they're on.

    If you move them, they'll change color. A clock rainbow. The other interesting home-screen color effect has to do with widgets, which don't use the accent color and therefore won't match your icons but instead dynamically color themselves based on the wallpaper directly behind them. You can actually move widgets around the screen and see them change color. The most amazing thing about Material You is that it somehow, always, percent of the time, works. The color combinations look great and never have a contrast issue.

    I have maliciously tried to break this by feeding the system crazy wallpapers like fully transparent PNGs, rainbow wallpapers, or wallpapers that aim to cause a contrast issue, and Material You always worked. The only time I've seen even a hint of a system issue is when I eyedropped an accent color from a previous screenshot and set that color as my wallpaper. Android 12 responded by dimming the wallpaper slightly so that everything was still readable.

    The worst thing you can say about any color combination is that it's boring, but you can always jump into the wallpaper settings again and pick a more vibrant color combination. The color system in Android 12 works unbelievably well. It's so much fun to change to a new wallpaper and see what color options will pop up, and I think it's going to be one of Android's most popular, easily marketed features.

    This is so that you can choose an image on your device to be the actual wallpaper with the battery indicator on top. The app contains all the kinds of notches that have come out. The first option fits best for devices like OnePlus 6, for instance. Configure it Configure Notch battery bar Configure Notch battery bar Next, you can configure the width and height of the battery indicator. The Battery Border toggle lets you enable and configure a border around your screen to go with the notch.

    This border does not part take in indicating the battery but it does change colors with the notch battery bar. When you tap on the Change colors button you can choose the color of the indicator depending on the percentage of battery. You only see it as you would if your battery was full.

    Energy Ring, on the other hand, draws over apps so it is visible all the time.


    thoughts on “Wallpaper for notch display

    • 19.08.2021 at 21:39
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      It is remarkable, this amusing opinion

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