Only the eagle eyed will spot a fake ielts reading answers


  • IELTS Reading Practice Test 44 with Answers
  • What are the biggest impacts of counterfeits on brands?
  • IELTS Reading- True, False, Not Given Tips and Strategy
  • IELTS Reading Practice Test 44 with Answers

    We had become so fed up of people visiting our advice centre in Salford, Greater Manchester, to complain about incomprehensible forms that we thought we ought to take action. At the time the shredding seemed like merely throwing sand in the eyes of the charging lion, but it briefly caught the public imagination and left an impression on government and business. One council began a letter to its tenants about a rent increase with two sentences averaging 95 words, full of bizarre housing finance jargon and waffle about Acts of Parliament.

    The London Borough of Ealing sent such an incomprehensible letter to ISO residents that 40 of them wrote or telephoned to complain and ask for clarification. In fact, the letter meant nothing of the sort, and the council had to send another letter to explain.

    B Plain legal English can be used as a marketing tactic. Provincial Insurance issued their plain English Home Cover policy in and sold it heavily as such. Recently, the Eagle Star Group launched a plain English policy to a chorus of congratulatory letters from policyholders. People, it seems, prefer to buy a policy they can understand. C Two kinds of instructions give us a lot of concern — medical labels and do-it-yourself products. With medical labels, there is a serious gap between what the professionals think is clear and what is really clear to patients.

    Unclear instructions on do-it-yourself products cause expense and frustration to customers. Writing the necessary instructions for these products is usually entrusted to someone who knows the product inside out, yet the best qualification for writing instructions is ignorance.

    The writer is then like a first-time user, discovering how to use the product in a step-by-step way. Instructions never seem to be tested with first-time users before being issued. So vital steps are missed out or components are mislabeled or not labelled at all. There were earlier government efforts to inform consumers about their rights and obligations, such as the Truth in Lending Act and the Fair Credit Billing Act , which emphasized a body of information that consumers need in simple language.

    All over the country isolated revolts or efforts against legalistic gobbledygook at the federal, state and corporate levels seemed to grow into a small revolution. E The Bastille has not fallen yet. The forces of resistance are strong, as one can see from the case of Pennsylvania as cited in the Scorecard.

    There are there main objections to the idea of plain English. Simply not true in all the ten states with plain English laws for consumer contracts and the 34 states with laws or regulations for insurance policies. Since when plain English law went into effect in New York there have been only four litigations and only two decisions.

    Massachusetts had zero cases. The cost of compliance would be enormous. Translation of legal contracts into non-legal everyday language would be a waster of time and money. The experience of several corporations has proved that the cost of compliance is often outweighed by solid benefits and litigation savings. Citibank of New York made history in by introducing a simplified promissory note and afterwards simplified all their forms. The only legal language that has been tested for centuries in the courts is precise enough to deal with a mortgage, a deed, a lease, or an insurance policy.

    Here, too, the experience of several corporations and insurance companies has proved that contracts and policies can be made more understandable without sacrificing legal effectiveness. G What does the future hold for the Plain English movement?

    Today, American consumers are buffeted by an assortment of pressures. Never before have consumers had as many choices in areas like financial services, travel, telephone services, and supermarket products. There are about long-distance phone companies in the US. Not long ago, the average supermarket carried 9, items; today, it carries 22, More importantly, this expansion of options — according to a recent report — is faced by a staggering 30 million Americans lacking the reading skills to handle the minimal demands of daily living.

    I still hear plain English on the TV and in the streets, and read plain English in popular magazines and best-sellers, but not yet in many functional documents.

    Despite some victories, the was against gobbledygook is not over yet.

    As you can see above, you will be given a number of factual statements and asked to look at the text and decide if the statement is true, false or not given. Most students are not used to answering questions like this and it causes them lots of problems because they are not sure what to look for. Students also fail to understand exactly what each statement means and therefore cannot identify if it is true or false. Many focus on keywords instead of understanding what the statement as a whole means.

    Another common mistake is identifying keywords in the statements and then trying to find words that exactly match them in the text. You can do this, but more often the words will be synonyms. Finally, some students fail to understand exactly what true, false and not given actually mean and get confused. Remember that we are dealing with factual information so there is no room to say it is similar or nearly the same.

    Not really. Base your answers on the text only. Identify any words that qualify the statement, for example, some, all, mainly, often, always and occasionally. These words are there to test if you have read the whole statement because they can change the meaning. There will be at least one of all three answers.

    You will have to read the appropriate part of the text very carefully in order to understand what the author means. You should also look for synonyms. Remember that you are matching meaning, not words. You probably have no idea because the answer is not there. Answers are in the same order they appear in the text. Do not waste time going back. Keep on reading. There are many different strategies and you should use the one you feel comfortable with.

    You can also adapt this strategy to what suits you. Read all the statements carefully, trying to understand what the whole sentence means rather than simply highlighting keywords. Watch out for qualifying words such as some or always. Try to think of what synonyms might be in the text. This will help you identify the matching part of the text.

    Match the statement with the correct part of the text. Focus on the statement again and then carefully read the matching part of the text to establish if it is true or false. Remember the meaning should exactly match that of the statement if it is true. Underline the words that give you the answer, this will help you focus and you can check back later.

    Again, be careful there are no qualifying words in the text. If you have any questions please let me know in the comments below or on the Facebook page.

    Provincial Insurance issued their plain English Home Cover policy in and sold it heavily as such. Recently, the Eagle Star Group launched a plain English policy to a chorus of congratulatory letters from policyholders. People, it seems, prefer to buy a policy they can understand. C Two kinds of instructions give us a lot of concern — medical labels and do-it-yourself products.

    With medical labels, there is a serious gap between what the professionals think is clear and what is really clear to patients. Unclear instructions on do-it-yourself products cause expense and frustration to customers. Writing the necessary instructions for these products is usually entrusted to someone who knows the product inside out, yet the best qualification for writing instructions is ignorance.

    The writer is then like a first-time user, discovering how to use the product in a step-by-step way. Instructions never seem to be tested with first-time users before being issued. So vital steps are missed out or components are mislabeled or not labelled at all. There were earlier government efforts to inform consumers about their rights and obligations, such as the Truth in Lending Act and the Fair Credit Billing Actwhich emphasized a body of information that consumers need in simple language.

    All over the country isolated revolts or efforts against legalistic gobbledygook at the federal, state and corporate levels seemed to grow into a small revolution. E The Bastille has not fallen yet. The forces of resistance are strong, as one can see from the case of Pennsylvania as cited in the Scorecard. There are there main objections to the idea of plain English.

    Simply not true in all the ten states with plain English laws for consumer contracts and the 34 states with laws or regulations for insurance policies. Since when plain English law went into effect in New York there have been only four litigations and only two decisions.

    Massachusetts had zero cases. The cost of compliance would be enormous. Remember that we are dealing with factual information so there is no room to say it is similar or nearly the same.

    Not really.

    What are the biggest impacts of counterfeits on brands?

    Base your answers on the text only. Identify any words that qualify the statement, for example, some, all, mainly, often, always and occasionally. These words are there to test if you have read the whole statement because they can change the meaning.

    There will be at least one of all three answers. You will have to read the appropriate part of the text very carefully in order to understand what the author means.

    You should also look for synonyms. Remember that you are matching meaning, not words. You probably have no idea because the answer is not there. Answers are in the same order they appear in the text.

    IELTS Reading- True, False, Not Given Tips and Strategy

    Do not waste time going back. Keep on reading. There are many different strategies and you should use the one you feel comfortable with. You can also adapt this strategy to what suits you. Read all the statements carefully, trying to understand what the whole sentence means rather than simply highlighting keywords.


    thoughts on “Only the eagle eyed will spot a fake ielts reading answers

    • 21.08.2021 at 01:15
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      I agree with you, thanks for the help in this question. As always all ingenious is simple.

      Reply
    • 22.08.2021 at 16:06
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      You are mistaken. I can defend the position. Write to me in PM.

      Reply

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