Drug supply management exam questions


  • Supply Chain Management MCQ Questions and Answers
  • Qualifying Examination Blueprint
  • Drug Supply Management Oct- Nov 2017 Past Question Paper
  • Pharmacist Interview Questions
  • Pharmacist Interview Questions
  • Drug Supply Management Oct- Nov 2017 Past Question Paper
  • Supply Chain Management MCQ Questions and Answers

    The exam blueprint informs candidates about what the exam will test and guides PEBC to design exams that are comparable from one time to the next, giving all candidates equal opportunity to show whether or not they have the competencies that are necessary to practise pharmacy safely and effectively in Canada. Therefore, all candidates should review this blueprint thoroughly and determine whether or not they are ready to practise pharmacy or if they need more preparation or experience in any competency area before taking the Qualifying Examination.

    Competencies are defined as significant job-related knowledge, skills, abilities, attitudes and judgments required for competent performance i. They provide an overview of what a pharmacist must be able to do at entry to practice, without supervision, when the need arises.

    To meet these standards, pharmacists need to have and apply the competencies described. To be certified by PEBC and registered as a pharmacist, candidates are required to demonstrate that they have these competencies, by successfully completing the Qualifying Examination.

    These percentages indicate how much of the Qualifying Examination both Parts combined is focused on each competency. This also indicates the relative importance of each competency in the exam results and final certification decisions.

    When both Parts assess the same competencies, they will often assess different aspects or elements of the same competency. The check marks in the columns on the left indicate whether the competency element is tested in one or both Parts of the exam.

    This reflects the paramount importance of this competency to achieve best possible patient outcomes. A double check mark beside the key competency element in each section indicates that the competency has a higher weighting in one Part of the exam than in the other Part.

    The role of the pharmacist in the Canadian health care system has evolved significantly over the past several years. The competencies for pharmacists and pharmacy technicians are closely aligned, with each group taking responsibility for their respective roles while working collaboratively.

    Pharmacists are primarily responsible for drug therapy advice and decision-making, focusing on the clinical aspects of patient care. Pharmacy technicians are primarily responsible for the technical functions and for referring patients to the pharmacist for drug therapy advice. Although some aspects of the scope of practice of the Canadian pharmacist may differ among jurisdictions and workplaces, the core competencies expected of pharmacists at entry to practice are the same.

    In all settings, when providing patient care, the pharmacist works in collaboration with the patient, pharmacy technicians and other health care professionals in order to achieve the best possible health outcomes for the patient.

    Qualifying Examination Blueprint

    Signature of prescriber and date PSD written. A PSD for the supply of medicines is classified as a prescription form. This form is a legal document and must comply with the requirements for prescriptions as specified in the Human Medicines Regulations 2. How long is a PSD valid for? There is no legally valid period for a PSD for administration of a medicine. The prescriber should include a start and finish date as appropriate within the direction to ensure it is acted on within a time frame following the assessment which is appropriate to the needs of the patient.

    This form is a legal document and supply must comply with the legislation of the validity of prescriptions. Appropriate measures should be taken to ensure that the supply and administration of the medicine remains safe to the point of administration and beyond e. Can the prescriber write a PSD remotely without a face-to-face consultation with the patient? Prescribers should refer to their professional regulatory body for advice if they are considering the need to write a PSD remotely during their practice 6.

    If this is not practicable undertaking a local risk assessment should be considered. The prescriber has a duty of care and is professionally and legally accountable for the care they provide. The prescriber must be satisfied that the person to whom the administration is delegated has the qualifications, experience, knowledge and skills to provide the care or treatment involved.

    Whilst anyone may follow a PSD for administration some organisations may extend or limit those who are authorised to administer medicines under a PSD within their local medicines policies and governance arrangements.

    The employing organisation has a duty of care to both the patient and to the staff and is responsible for ensuring that the staff it employs are properly trained and undertake only those responsibilities specified in agreed job descriptions. If expecting non-regulated staff e.

    Prescribers and anyone administering or supplying medicines must ensure that they adhere to clinical governance policies and procedures and associated arrangements. What are the accountabilities and responsibilities of the delegated staff? A person who supplies or administers a medicine is accountable for their own practice 5 and must be trained and competent to undertake such tasks. They must act according to their level of competence and in accordance with the directions of the prescriber.

    January

    Drug Supply Management Oct- Nov 2017 Past Question Paper

    Pharmacist Interview Questions

    This question is important as it checks a candidates problem-solving skills. How would you address the issue? I would check the type of medication they were prescribed since certain meds require the entire amount is taken for them to work, and if that were the case with their prescriptions, I would let them know they needed to take all the medication to see results.

    How would you explain the situation to the patient? A: Pharmacists have to deal with all types of people.

    Pharmacist Interview Questions

    This question will let you know if they are capable of handling the different personalities they will encounter on the job. The goal with the phone call is to get ahead of the situation and prevent an in-store confrontation. This question gives the candidate an opportunity to explain more broadly how they think about the business of pharmacy. What to look for: See if applicants are a good fit for your pharmacy Can they bring value to the business Example: Providing great patient care is probably the best thing you can do for the business side of pharmacy.

    The exam blueprint informs candidates about what the exam will test and guides PEBC to design exams that are comparable from one time to the next, giving all candidates equal opportunity to show whether or not they have the competencies that are necessary to practise pharmacy safely and effectively in Canada.

    Therefore, all candidates should review this blueprint thoroughly and determine whether or not they are ready to practise pharmacy or if they need more preparation or experience in any competency area before taking the Qualifying Examination. Competencies are defined as significant job-related knowledge, skills, abilities, attitudes and judgments required for competent performance i. They provide an overview of what a pharmacist must be able to do at entry to practice, without supervision, when the need arises.

    Drug Supply Management Oct- Nov 2017 Past Question Paper

    To meet these standards, pharmacists need to have and apply the competencies described. To be certified by PEBC and registered as a pharmacist, candidates are required to demonstrate that they have these competencies, by successfully completing the Qualifying Examination.

    These percentages indicate how much of the Qualifying Examination both Parts combined is focused on each competency. This also indicates the relative importance of each competency in the exam results and final certification decisions.

    When both Parts assess the same competencies, they will often assess different aspects or elements of the same competency.


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