Guild member spycraft 5e


  • RPG Campaigns
  • Assassin Rogue In D&D 5e | Complete Guide
  • The College of Whispers Bard in D&D 5e | Full Guide
  • Ebonclad: A 5E DnD Thieves’ Guild Setting + 7 New Adventures
  • Exploring the Guild Artisan Background
  • Horde-ing => Creating Factions the Fast and Easy Way
  • RPG Campaigns

    The ruler or public face of a group. Once you know the faces of your group, create them as NPCs. If they are likely to come into contact with the PCs often or oppose them, then you may want to stat them out. Otherwise, just a couple of sentences describing them and individual points of interest about them will be enough. To determine how many faces I will have for the Sons of Xia, I roll two and decide I will pick a historical figure and an enemy of the guild. For the historical figure I go for Xia, the founder of the group.

    Given his creation of a guild designed to overthrow the local nobility, I decide he was the child of a noble born with some sort of infernal taint that lead to his parents abandoning him for fear of the scandal. Xia was forced to turn to thievery to survive. He was eventually taken into a local guild and somehow found a way to spread his taint throughout the guild and turn them into a weapon to use against those who had cast him out so long ago.

    The enemy of the guild is going to be Sergeant Dalamin, a member of the city guard. He has stumbled onto evidence of nobles being manipulated by an outside force. He suspects the corruption runs deeper than he knows, because his attempt to bring this to light lead to him being ridiculed and then reduced in rank. He now keeps his suspicions secret, but has sworn to bring this shadowy force to justice and restore his good name.

    Pick An Additional Secret About The Group Most societies and groups will have a skeleton or two in their closet or some sort of secret only their inner circle are privy to. I suggest having one secret or perhaps two if the group is going to feature prominently in your campaign. Too many will start to make the society or group seem a little silly and unlikely.

    Either pick a secret or roll on the table below: d6 Secret Notes 1 Inner Circle Inside the group is another smaller group ruling it, perhaps with a much different goal to the main group. Create this as a separate group using this system.

    Either generate the rebels as a separate group or individual NPCs. I decide to pick two secrets for the Sons of Xia. The first is going to be an inner circle, a group of powerful, demonically tainted sorcerers bound together through demonic pact. I will create these as a trio of individual NPCs at a later point when they are needed. For now, it is just enough to know the guild has these secret masters and let their existence guide my RP of the group.

    The second secret is powerful patron. When the original Xia began to grow old, he used his heritage to summon his demonic ancestor. He created a pact known as the Blood of Xia whereby the inner circle of the guild would be always be bound together, pledged to continue his goals of overthrowing the ruling nobility.

    Decide On The Competency Level Of The Group Should the player characters ever find themselves opposing lay members of the group then you will need stats.

    However, far simpler is to pick a couple of things the generic NPCs of your group are good at and assign them an above average competency rating in those skills. Then add a couple of things they are bad at and give them a slight penalty on these rolls. Everything else can be a straight roll or a zero skill bonus. Generic Sons of Xia thieves get a bonus on thieving, sneaking, and bribing rolls.

    They get penalties to resist intimidation, turn down bribes, and face to face fighting. Wrapping Up Following all the above steps should give you everything you need to create a group as a single NPC in your game. This will save you time for those things you really need to spend it on in your campaign. It also gives you the flexibility to expand the groups later should you need to do so, adding more faces, secrets, or resources.

    Unfortunately, another player had to drop out, as our chosen game night conflicts with his busy family schedule. Enough to keep the action going, because chances are out of five at least one player wants to do something. So the druid parts ways with the group, and Roscoe the rogue his player was absent last session, and we remove such PCs from play till next session and Belenos the Philosopher re-unite with the party.

    There are two ways to let spy PCs shine in front of their non-spy companions. The first is to have your spy PCs working their spy skills right in front of their non-spy companions, without having the companions see. For instance, the spy tells his companions they need to go out for a walk through the city marketplace, so he can make contact with some informants. The spy then rolls for making successful brush passes having one person covertly hand something to another while stepping past them or rolls to successfully carry out a seemly innocent, coded conversation with an informant i.

    The second way is for the spy to give their teammates just enough training and equipment to allow them to help. But what can a spy do, however, if they have to shadow a suspicious spy? They can get their team to help. They need to teach their team how to not look at the person they are following, how to use reflective surfaces to watch someone, how to covertly signal their team members they think they might have been spotted and someone else needs to step up and continue the shadowing.

    The crafty spy might even use the clumsy attempts at shadowing made by his teammates to distract the target from his presence, allowing the spy character to shadow successfully. How about tips for keeping their not-so-stealthy party allies and friends engaged in stealth and espionage adventures?

    There are a lot of spy activities, however, where those skills are not required or where other skills can substitute. If you are a mage or druid, however, you can accomplish the same thing by having the target followed from above by a bird, insect, or minor air elemental.

    Even clunky fighters can follow someone, if there are a team of them. The fighters can switch off who is doing the following. One fighter follows closely for a short time, keeping the target in sight.

    Then, before the target gets suspicious, they drop back and another fighter takes over. If you have a large enough team, you can follow the target for quite some time without them noticing. While making covert contact with an informant would normally be a spy activity, what happens when the spy is a halfling or elf, and the informant is a dwarf living in the dwarven ghetto of a city? Suddenly the dwarven cleric has to go in alone, following a series of odd instructions for making contact with an agent.

    The GM can have a lot of fun with this. What will the halfling archer do when the informant they need to meet turns out to be another halfling who engages in hobbit-mud-wrestling as a entertainment in one of seedier bars?

    Or more synergistic spycraft tips like creating distractions where spy and non-spy characters directly help one another in spy missions? In my fantasy campaign, the player characters are a diverse group, with different races and skills.

    Over time the spymaster has come to trust the team enough to give them broad goals, without specifying how the goal should be accomplished. He usually lets the team figure out how they can best accomplish the goal. For instance, the spymaster might assign them to cause political unrest between two neighboring city-states. After some fascinating debate, the team decides the best way to accomplish this goal is to: Let paranoia grow in silence.

    Feed paranoia lies. Create a false diplomatic document, showing city-state 1 is attempting to forge an alliance with an enemy of city-state 2.

    Disrupting the courier service takes the whole team, although at different stages of the mission. The spy has to find out who the couriers are and how to tell when one is being dispatched. The mage needs to figure out how to get a message from the city-state to the fighters hidden in the wilderness, to alert them a courier is being dispatched.

    The fighters need to intercept the courier and make them disappear without a trace. Creating the false diplomatic document takes the whole team, working together. The spy can pick pocket the ambassador, if he can only get close enough…but how to get past those pesky body guards? The answer, the rest of the party creates a distraction such as a brawl or a robust round of threats and insults.

    The false document is then placed on the body of one of the previously mentioned couriers. That body is left on a path between city-state 1 and the enemy of city-state 2, in a location where it will be found by the patrols of city-state 2. The party can now sit back and watch the tensions rise, they can continue to eliminate couriers to further increase tensions, or they can get the heck out of the area in case war erupts. Johnn, I hope these are helpful. I first saw them in an rpg in Heroes of Battle to have a battlefield change based on character actions.

    The most recent and profound is in the Smallville rpg, Cortex Dramatic Roleplaying. Now, using a few character-driven questions, I create a flowchart for my players no matter the setting and tie them together for easier visual representation of character conflict. Here is an example of one of my flowcharts. They are from a mobile app for Android called DrawExpress Light, which is awesome.

    Here is another, more detailed about the party and their own interactions. Thank you for your helpful ideas. Having traps with a time component are fun too. The biggest issue is some characters are not set up for stealth. Make a few potions and magic items to help.

    Mission training helps too. You should also realize your tanks will most likely have to take off their armor, so adjust battles accordingly. That is a good feat, by the way, to get them to take it off. I usually break it up with small hideouts and then the final installation. But if you do this you may need to give them some things to help in this regard, before they get captured, to help them escape.

    It is always good to have a Mastermind or villain, and have him get away a few times before getting caught or killed.

    Maybe he was at the first location, the PCs catch a glimpse of him leaving at the second, and they finally catch up with him at the third. And, of course, he may not even be the real mastermind. My Pathfinder adventure ended with over miniatures in play at once see photo — all the white dragons are dracoliches. There was a human army, undead army, dracolich army of dragons, and dragon army all in play at once. It was awesome.

    Assassin Rogue In D&D 5e | Complete Guide

    The Assassin Rogue may be a master of disguise who prefers to blend in to their surroundings to get closer to their target. On the other hand, they may prefer to keep their distance and strike with a decisive shot from a bow or crossbow.

    Whatever approach the Assassin chooses, they are bound to rely on a combination of speed, stealth, and the element of surprise to accomplish their goals. They maneuver around the battlefield and strike at enemies when and where they are most vulnerable.

    Dealing tons of damage with their trusty Sneak Attack, the Assassin is able to assist their party in making quick work of enemies. Assassins are at their best when the party is able to get the jump on enemies.

    With the element of surprise, the Assassin can take out a threat before they even get a chance to act! The others are still very useful, but play to a more intrigue-heavy situation or style of play. Disguise kits add a ton of flavor to the game and can be incredibly useful. This is especially true for an Assassin who is looking for a clever way to get close to a target. With a good disguise, some convincing, and a sharp blade, the Assassin can unload some major damage on an enemy before they even get a chance to retaliate.

    With a bit of preparation, poisons can be very useful. Plus, any hits you score against a creature that is surprised are automatically considered to be a critical hit. A surprised creature will not have had the chance to act in combat yet. Against a surprised creature, you roll your attack with advantage and get an automatic critical hit if the attack lands.

    This is incredible and well worth the time to set up situations where the Assassin can initiate combat to get this bonus.

    First things first, you want to identify who your target is. You want to look for what enemy is likely going to be the biggest threat in combat. This might be a wizard that you can potentially drop with a single Sneak Attack. Additionally, you want to look for any enemies who are isolated. Sneak Attack the stragglers with advantage for hiding , use your Cunning Action Rogue ability to take cover again, rinse and repeat! You may also consider ranged combat to give you even more options to maneuver and hide.

    Just remember: focus on surprising the enemy and neutralizing threats before they can become a problem! With this, you are able to create a new identity. This can be very useful for infiltrating certain organizations and getting closer to targets. After a week of work and 25gp , you have a new identity complete with an established history, profession, and affiliations. As one would expect, this works best in campaigns with lots of intrigue.

    Having to take a week for all of the preparation and work necessary to create the identity may not vibe in certain situations. Your party will need to be ok with taking a week to do other things while you create the identity.

    If your party is fine with hanging out for a week and you have time to create your identity, it can give you some interesting options on your adventure.

    It is fully possible to have a different identity in every town or city that you visit! This includes their speech, behavior, and handwriting as long as all three have been observed. The casual observer will not be able to tell a difference between you and who you are impersonating. Someone who suspects something may look closer, but you still get advantage on any Charisma Deception check you make to avoid being detected.

    As with the Infiltration Expertise ability, this works best if you coordinate with your party. Being able to observe a guard captain, for example, gives you the information you need to impersonate them. Assassinating them and taking their identity as cover would give you free reign to explore and provide valuable recon information to your party.

    Nevertheless, this ability relies on your party agreeing to a plan that makes use of your skill. If they would prefer to storm the base instead of just sitting there while you do recon work, it may be better to stick with the majority to avoid frustrating other players. This means that the DC is 19 unless you have any magic items that would make it more difficult. So because the creature is surprised, you are attacking with advantage.

    Your Assassinate ability means that the attack will automatically result in a critical hit, which doubles the damage dice. If the target fails their save, the damage doubles again from Death Strike. You hit and the target fails their save against Death Strike. Just for laughs, it would mean a maximum damage of in this example. This is enough to drop most enemies in a single hit. Connections In many ways, the Assassin is what most players picture when they think of a Rogue. Only the Thief archetype is potentially more iconic to the base class.

    The most classic example is that of a Bounty Hunter. They might be a member of a guild or organization who specialize in fulfillment of certain contracts. If this feels too morally gray, the organization may only accept contracts for justified killings with full approval from the authorities.

    On the other hand, they might be more accustomed to life outside of an organization. They might be more of the lone wolf type or may be most comfortable in a small group. Is the Assassin Rogue Archetype Good? The Assassin can put out some incredible damage. The Death Strike ability does a lot to help the archetype stand out in the late game. For the Assassin, the value is mostly packed into that first strike. These conversations can certainly be had in-character to add to the roleplaying of your game.

    Speaking of which… Injecting intrigue and spycraft into a campaign can be fun, but it relies on everyone at the table wanting to play that kind of game. Otherwise it gets boring and frustrating in a hurry. It might be incredibly fun for the Assassin to create their disguise, do a bunch of recon and fully explore a location, possibly make time for some sabotage, then come back and report what happened.

    But all the while, the other players at the table are rolling their eyes, scrolling Instagram, or anything else. That may be important to you or you might not particularly care. Either way, it is something to consider before choosing this archetype. Consider what type of players are at your table!

    Pssst… we talk about the different types of players in this article that you should check out! Subscribe To Tabletop Joab's Newsletter! Subscribers get updates on all of the latest news, posts, and offerings from Tabletop Joab!

    The College of Whispers Bard in D&D 5e | Full Guide

    You want to look for what enemy is likely going to be the biggest threat in combat. This might be a wizard that you can potentially drop with a single Sneak Attack. Additionally, you want to look for any enemies who are isolated. Sneak Attack the stragglers with advantage for hidinguse your Cunning Action Rogue ability to take cover again, rinse and repeat! You may also consider ranged combat to give you even more options to maneuver and hide.

    Just remember: focus on surprising the enemy and neutralizing threats before they can become a problem! With this, you are able to create a new identity.

    Ebonclad: A 5E DnD Thieves’ Guild Setting + 7 New Adventures

    This can be very useful for infiltrating certain organizations and getting closer to targets. After a week of work and 25gpyou have a new identity complete with an established history, profession, and affiliations. As one would expect, this works best in campaigns with lots of intrigue. Having to take a week for all of the preparation and work necessary to create the identity may not vibe in certain situations.

    Your party will need to be ok with taking a week to do other things while you create the identity. If your party is fine with hanging out for a week and you have time to create your identity, it can give you some interesting options on your adventure. It is fully possible to have a different identity in every town or city that you visit!

    This includes their speech, behavior, and handwriting as long as all three have been observed. The casual observer will not be able to tell a difference between you and who you are impersonating.

    Someone who suspects something may look closer, but you still get advantage on any Charisma Deception check you make to avoid being detected. As with the Infiltration Expertise ability, this works best if you coordinate with your party. Being able to observe a guard captain, for example, gives you the information you need to impersonate them.

    Assassinating them and taking their identity as cover would give you free reign to explore and provide valuable recon information to your party.

    Nevertheless, this ability relies on your party agreeing to a plan that makes use of your skill. If they would prefer to storm the base instead of just sitting there while you do recon work, it may be better to stick with the majority to avoid frustrating other players. This opens up the opportunity for you to impersonate this person and cause a bit of chaos.

    Gaining Information with Mantle of Whispers Mantle of Whispers can also be very useful for learning potentially important information. The information is enough that you can pass yourself off as the person by drawing on its memories. Another creature can see through his tamil ebooks by succeeding on a Wisdom Insight check contested by your Charisma Deception check. Enemies will have a very hard time seeing past your disguise.

    As an action, you magically whisper a phrase that only one creature of your choice within 30 feet of you can hear. On a successful save, your whisper sounds like unintelligible mumbling and has no effect. On a failed saving throw, the target is charmed by you for the next 8 hours or until you or your allies attack it, damage it, or force it to make a saving throw. It interprets the whispers as a description of its most mortifying secrets.

    You gain no knowledge of this secret, but the target is convinced you know it. It will be useful to keep a casting of Tongues up your sleeve if you plan on using this. The charmed creature obeys your commands for fear that you will reveal its secret. It grants you favors and gifts it would offer to a close friend. When the effect ends, the creature has no understanding of why it held you in such fear. You can probably get them to tell you about any traps or secret passages up ahead.

    In combat, you have completed removed an enemy from attacking you and your group. Out of combat, the sky is the limit with what you can have them doing for you. As far as subclass capstones go, this one is fantastic and has no shortage of creative uses. Connections Connecting a College of Whispers Bard into your game can be done pretty easily. These are natural schemers and manipulators, after all! Do they initially view the party members as means to an end but eventually find themselves beginning to care about them?

    Exploring the Guild Artisan Background

    Also, consider how your character works within the social fabric of their stomping grounds. The first is to have your spy PCs working their spy skills right in front of their non-spy companions, without having the companions see.

    For instance, the spy tells his companions they need to go out for a walk through the city marketplace, so he can make contact with some informants. The spy then rolls for making successful brush passes having one person covertly hand something to another while stepping past them or rolls to successfully carry out a seemly innocent, coded conversation with an informant i.

    The second way is for the spy to give their teammates just enough training and equipment to allow them to help. But what can a spy do, however, if they have to shadow a suspicious spy? They can get their team to help.

    They need to teach their team how to not look at the person they are following, how to use reflective surfaces to watch someone, how to covertly signal their team members they think they might have been spotted and someone else needs to step up and continue the shadowing.

    The crafty spy might even use the clumsy attempts at shadowing made by his teammates to distract the target from his presence, allowing the spy character to shadow successfully. How about tips for keeping their not-so-stealthy party allies and friends engaged in stealth and espionage adventures?

    There are a lot of spy activities, however, where those skills are not required or where other skills can substitute. If you are a mage or druid, however, you can accomplish the same thing by having the target followed from above by a bird, insect, or minor air elemental.

    Even clunky fighters can follow someone, if there are a team of them. The fighters can switch off who is doing the following. One fighter follows closely for a short time, keeping the target in sight.

    Then, before the target gets suspicious, they drop back and another fighter takes over.

    Horde-ing => Creating Factions the Fast and Easy Way

    If you have a large enough team, you can follow the target for quite some time without them noticing. While making covert contact with an informant would normally be a spy activity, what happens when the spy is a halfling or elf, and the informant is a dwarf living in the dwarven ghetto of a city?

    Suddenly the dwarven cleric has to go in alone, following a series of odd instructions for making contact with an agent. The GM can have a lot of fun with this. What will the halfling archer do when the informant they need to meet turns out to be another halfling who engages in hobbit-mud-wrestling as a entertainment in one of seedier bars?

    Or more synergistic spycraft tips like creating distractions where spy and non-spy characters directly help one another in spy missions? In my fantasy campaign, the player characters are a diverse group, with different races and skills. Over time the spymaster has come to trust the team enough to give them broad goals, without specifying how the goal should be accomplished.

    He usually lets the team figure out how they can best accomplish the goal. For instance, the spymaster might assign them to cause political unrest between two neighboring city-states. After some fascinating debate, the team decides the best way to accomplish this goal is to: Let paranoia grow in silence. Feed paranoia lies. Create a false diplomatic document, showing city-state 1 is attempting to forge an alliance with an enemy of city-state 2.

    Disrupting the courier service takes the whole team, although at different stages of the mission. The spy has to find out who the couriers are and how to tell when one is being dispatched.

    The mage needs to figure out how to get a message from the city-state to the fighters hidden in the wilderness, to alert them a courier is being dispatched. The fighters need to intercept the courier and make them disappear without a trace. Creating the false diplomatic document takes the whole team, working together.

    The spy can pick pocket the ambassador, if he can only get close enough…but how to get past those pesky body guards? The answer, the rest of the party creates a distraction such as a brawl or a robust round of threats and insults. The false document is then placed on the body of one of the previously mentioned couriers.

    That body is left on a path between city-state 1 and the enemy of city-state 2, in a location where it will be found by the patrols of city-state 2. The party can now sit back and watch the tensions rise, they can continue to eliminate couriers to further increase tensions, or they can get the heck out of the area in case war erupts.

    Johnn, I hope these are helpful. I first saw them in an rpg in Heroes of Battle to have a battlefield change based on character actions.


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